A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal

A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal free pdf ebook was written by Adapted From Montana on December 19, 2005 consist of 98 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.maine-nutrition.org and available on pdfpedia since February 18, 2012.

making it balance and kickin' it up! a cycle menu for maine child care spring 2008 this booklet was designed for participants of the maine child and adult care food ...

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A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal pdf




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A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 1
A Cycle Menu for Maine Child Care Spring 2008 Adapted from: A Cycle Menu for Montana Child Care, Master Volume 3 September 2005 Making It Balance and Kickin’ It Up! A Cycle Menu for Maine Child Care Maine Department of Education Maine Department of Health & Human Services Spring 2008
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A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 2
Making It Balance and Kickin’ It Up! A Cycle Menu for Maine Child Care Spring 2008 This booklet was designed for participants of the Maine Child and Adult Care Food Program. The menus (5 weeks of breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack), with accompanying recipes and resources, are provided to assist childcare providers in serving healthy meals which are cost effective, easy to prepare, and appealing to children. The Maine Child and Adult Care Food Program staff is willing to assist you with any questions you may have. Making It Balance and Kickin’ It Up will be available electronically at http://www.maine-nutrition.org/ For More Information: Family/Group Day Care Providers please contact your local CACFP Sponsoring Organization. Child Care Centers contact: Maine Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) Rillta Taylor, Agreement Administrator, Phone: (207) 624-7924 Lyn Ludington, Agreement Administrator, Phone: (207) 624-7925 Developed by: Molly Stenberg, RD, Montana Team Nutrition Program; and Katie Bark, RD, Montana Team Nutrition Program, 202 Romney Gym, MSU, Bozeman, MT, 59717 Brenda Peppers, Nutrition Specialist, Montana Child and Adult Care Food Program MT DPHHS, PO Box 202925, Helena, MT 59620-2925 Adapted by: * Judy Gatchell, Coordinator: Child Nutrition and Agriculture Projects Maine Nutrition Network, Muskie School of Public Service, USM * Lyn Ludington, Agreement Administrator, Child and Adult Care Food Program Maine Department of Health and Human Services * Chuck Leithiser, Nutrition Coordinator, Penquis Child Development * Sonja Carvalho, Administrative Manager, Catholic Charities Maine Family Child Care Edited by: Karen Erickson, Administrative Assistant II, Muskie School of Public Service, USM This project is funded by a 2004 USDA Team Nutrition Training Grant, awarded to the Montana Office of Public Instruction, an equal opportunity program and the Child and Adult Care Food Program, “In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability. To file a complaint of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326–W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, or call (202)720-5964 (voice and TDD). USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer.”
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 3
Table of Contents 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Introduction and General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Menu Planning Tools List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Week Menu Cycle of Breakfast, Lunch and Snack . . . . . . . CACFP Meal Pattern Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sample Weekly Grocery List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Good Food Sources of Iron List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Good Food Sources of Vitamin A List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Good Food Sources of Vitamin C List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Whole Grain Information Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fiber Information Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seasonal Produce List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fruits and Vegetables by Color Listing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Let’s Get Descriptive Word List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monthly Nutrition Events Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Menu Planning Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Maine and National Resources and Organizations . . . . . . . Six Simple Steps to a Healthy Weight for Kids . . . . . . . . . . . Team Nutrition and Child Care Working Together . . . . . . . . . Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2 Pages 3-4 Pages 5-9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Pages 15-16 Pages 17-18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Pages 23-24 Pages 25-28 Pages 29-30 Page 31 Page 32 Appendix A
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 4
Introduction and General Information Childcare providers play an important role in children’s lives, especially by helping them to learn life-long healthy eating and physical activity habits. Not only do caregivers have the opportunity to teach children but also to reach parents with nutrition and health information. Nutritious foods help young children grow physically and mentally. Enjoying meals and snacks in a pleasant setting with friends and a trusted caregiver is the perfect opportunity for children to learn social skills, table manners and become familiar with eating a variety of healthy foods. Feeding children can be challenging, but it can also be fun! Get the children involved in simple food preparation tasks. Use your menus and recipes as a chance to teach children about foods- colors, tastes, textures, where food grows, and more. You are a role model for teaching healthy eating, not only about the food itself, but also attitudes related to meal times and feeding children. Don’t get frustrated. Many children need to be exposed to a new food at least 10 times (or more!) before they will taste it. Encourage them to put a spoonful of a new food on their plate, feel the texture, look at the colors, but do not make them eat it. It is the caregiver’s role to provide healthy food at regular meals and snacks. It is the child’s responsibility to decide what foods to eat and how much to eat. Please respect this division of responsibility. Children respond naturally to their own hunger and satiety cues. If forced to eat, these satiety cues can be overlooked, leading to overeating and emotional eating.* For more information on feeding preschool children, please refer to the resources listed on pages 23-28. This menu cycle was orginally designed for participants of the Montana Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP). Permission was granted to use and adapt this information for the child care givers in Maine. The 5 week menu cycle for breakfast, lunch, and one snack (with accompanying recipes) will help you serve cost effective, healthy meals that are easy to prepare and appealing to children. The menu cycle and recipes are designed to meet the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 and encourage these healthful habits: At least half of the grains consumed by children should be whole grains. Children ages 2-8 should consume 1.5 to 3 cups per day of fat-free or low-fat milk or equivalent milk products. Children should consume a variety of fruits and vegetables, lean meats or other protein foods. Children should spend 60 minutes per day being physically active. Menu planning is an important step in preparing balanced meals and snacks. When planning menus, be sure to take into consideration variety, color, texture, meal pattern components, and how all of these blend together throughout an entire day. This fun and healthy menu cycle has been developed with suggestions from various Montana and Maine childcare professionals, providers and nutritionists. We hope it is a helpful tool for serving healthy, kid-friendly meals and snacks. * Referenced from Ellyn Satter's book, How to Get Your Child to Eat, But Not Too Much 2
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 5
Included in This Resource: Cycle Menu, Recipes (Appendix A), and Menu Planning Tools This resource includes a 5 week menu cycle, healthy and fun recipes, and a list of useful menu planning tools to make menu planning easy for you. Five Week Menu Cycle: The menu cycle provides menus for 5 weeks of breakfast, lunch and afternoon snacks. The menu is designed for children ages 3-5 years old, but can be modified for different age groups as needed. The menu cycle meets the CACFP meal pattern requirements for iron, Vitamin A and Vitamin C sources, and low fat meats; and promotes whole grain consumption. All bread and bread alternates must be made with enriched or whole grains. CACFP meal pattern requirements can be found on page 10. Iron sources are indicated with an “I”, Vitamin A sources with an “A” and Vitamin C sources with a “C”. The cycle menu can be used in its entirety or feel free to select menus and recipes to add variety to your current menu. The meals and snacks are numbered for day care home providers using the Minute Menu System. Recipes: There are 60 recipes included in Appendix A and they are organized alphabetically by recipe name. Recipes are coded with the corresponding week, day and meal of the menu cycle. Recipes, highlighted in bold font on the menu cycle, are numbered corresponding to the meals and snacks for day care home providers using the Minute Menu System. Each recipe provides a nutrition and physical activity tip, found at the bottom of the recipe. We encourage you to share these tips with the children, parents, and families. Recipes from Montana providers are noted on the recipe source, located at the bottom of each recipe. Many of the recipes provided are from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Child Care Recipes-Food for Health and Fun , listed on page 23 of this booklet. 1
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 6
Menu Planning Tools List: 1. A Weekly Grocery Shopping List-A blank weekly grocery list is provided as a sample. Shopping weekly can save you time and assures that you have ingredients on hand. Grouping similar food items together helps you shop quickly and efficiently. 2. Good Food Sources of Iron List - Make sure you are offering 3-4 iron rich foods daily. (Children who receive 3 meals plus snacks while at child care need 4-6 servings of iron rich foods per day.) 3. Good Food Sources of Vitamin A List - Make sure you are serving a Vitamin A rich food every other day. 4. Good Food Sources of Vitamin C List - Make sure you are serving at least one Vitamin C rich food daily. 5. Whole Grain Information Sheet - Learn what whole grains are and how to incorporate into your menus. 6. Fiber Information Sheet - Learn how to increase fiber in your menus. 7. List of Seasonal Produce - Take advantage of reasonably priced seasonal fresh fruits and vegetables and enjoy eating them! 8. Fruits and Vegetables by Color Listing - Children love colors. The natural colors of fruits and vegetables can make learning about nutrition fun. 9. Let’s Get Descriptive Word List - A quick and easy way to make a regular meal sound mouth- watering. 10. Monthly Nutrition Events Calendar - Use this calendar of food-related events to highlight special foods, colors, and holidays in your monthly menus. For example, celebrate Salad Month in May by trying a new salad each week, letting the children help prepare it, and sending healthy salad recipes home to parents. 4
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 7
Making It Balance and Kickin’ It Up A Cycle Menu for Maine Childcare Mastnu Volume 3 Spring 2008 This menu meets the CACFP meal standards for children ages 3-5 years old; and may contain foods which present a choking hazard for younger children such as raw vegetables, raisins, pretzels, apples and grapes. Please substitute appropriate foods for children under 3 years of age. Whole milk is recommended for children age 1-2 years. 1% milk or Skim is recommended for children age 2 and older. All bread and bread alternates must be made with enriched or whole grains. Frozen Fruit should be no sugar added. Canned fruit should be juice or water packed. The meals and snacks are numbered for day care home providers using the Minute Menu System. Week 1 Monday Tuesday Yogurt/Fruit Parfait with Cereal I Milk 56 57 Wednesday Banana Crunch Pop C Graham cracker I Milk 58 Thursday Friday Breakfast Breakfast Whole Grain Banana Muffin I Applesauce Milk High fiber cold cereal I Oven French Toast I Canned fruit cocktail A, C Seasonal melon or orange slices C Milk Milk 81 60 Baked Beans (I) Perfect Cornbread I Spinach Salad I, A, C Canned apricots A, I Milk Macaroni (I) & Cheese Porcupine Meatball I (recommend using brown rice and lean ground beef in recipe) Mashed potato C Green beans Whole wheat dinner roll I Milk 157 Corn Flake Baked Chicken Breasts I Brown rice pilaf I Steamed broccoli A, C Canned peaches A Milk 158 PB (I) & J sandwich on Lunch/Suppe r Lunch/Supper with Ham I Frozen peas A,C Orange slices C Milk 156 whole wheat bread I Low-fat mozzarella cheese stick Sunny Carrot Salad A Apple slices C Milk 181 168 Snack Snack Chex Mix I Strawberries C (fresh in season or frozen) 256 Apple slices C Perfect Peanut Butter Dip I 257 Tortilla chips I Black Bean Dip I Fruit (to provide Mini bagel (I) with cream ½ cup fruit) cheese Animal crackers I (made 100% Juice with enriched flour) 258 281 260 Bold font indicates recipe provided. I = Iron source; A = Vitamin A source; C = Vitamin C source 5
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 8
Week 2 Monday Tuesday Banana bread I Orange slices C Milk 62 Wednesday Sunshine Tacos (eggs, cheese, taco shell) Melon C if in season or canned fruit Milk 63 Thursday Homemade Biscuit I Banana slices C Milk Friday Breakfast Whole wheat or whole grain waffles I Blueberries, blackberries, or strawberries C Milk 61 Pancakes (I) topped with served with peanut butter I Applesauce and Milk 64 65 Turkey(I) and cheese sandwich on Pita bread I Cucumber slices w/ hummus dip I Fruit cocktail A, C or canned peaches A Milk Pork Stir Fry A, I, C (pork, Tater Tot Casserole (I) broccoli, carrots, mixed vegetables) Brown rice (I) Fresh fruit Milk Bean (I) and Cheese Burritos on whole wheat tortilla I Romaine and dark green lettuce salad A, C, I Seasonal fresh fruit or canned apricots A, I Milk 164 BBQ Beef Cups I (biscuit dough (I), ground beef (I) mixture in a muffin tin) Celery and carrot sticks A w/ Lowfat and Yummy Dressing Pineapple rings C Milk 165 Lunch/Supper 162 with chicken Frozen lima beans C, I or green beans Mandarin oranges A, C Breadstick I Milk 161 163 ½ Baked Apple (C) Snack sprinkled with ¼ cup raisins I Graham cracker I 261 Low-fat or fat free Yogurt Kiwi fruit C 262 Grapes cut in half Cottage cheese 263 Pumpkin bread A, I 100% juice 264 Gone Fishin -low-fat or fat free yogurt, fish crackers, and pretzel sticks I 265 Bold font indicates recipe provided. I = Iron source; A = Vitamin A source; C = Vitamin C source 6
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 9
Week 3 Monday Tuesday Hens on the Nest (½ English muffin (I), egg and cheese) Orange slices C Milk 67 Wednesday Whole wheat bagel (I) with peanut butter I Fresh or frozen berries C Milk 68 Thursday Oatmeal I (fortified, instant) with raisins (I) 100% Juice Milk 82 Friday Pumpkin Pancakes A, I Canned pears C Milk Breakfast High fiber cold cereal (I ) Strawberries C (fresh if in season or frozen) Milk 66 70 Nuggets Seven grain bread I Frozen corn or corn on the cob if in season Watermelon (A, C) or cantelope (A, C ) or seasonal fruit Milk 167 Lunch/Supper Baked Spaghetti (made Baked Turkey Breast I with lean ground beef or Volcano Potato (mashed Hamburger (I) on whole wheat bun I Baked Beans I Apple slices C Milk Lime-marinated Chicken Tasty Lemony Fish 168 Breasts I Peas and carrots A, C Brown rice pilaf I Kiwi fruit or Vit C fruit Milk ground turkey (I) and sweet potato A, C) noodles (I)) Whole wheat roll I Romaine and dark green Fresh or frozen berries C lettuce salad A, C, I Milk Mandarin Oranges A, C Milk 166 170 182 Snack Finger pancakes (I) Fruit cocktail ( A, C) 266 Peach Crisp (A, C, I) Milk 267 Low-fat or fat free Yogurt parfait w/ Granola (I) and fruit 268 Apple Smiles C Fig bar I 282 Junior Trail Mix I Grapes cut in half 270 Bold font indicates recipe provided. I = Iron source; A = Vitamin A source; C = Vitamin C source 7
A cycle menu and recipes for children ages 3-5, meets CACFP meal  - page 10
Week 4 Monday Tuesday Whole wheat toast I Wednesday Baked French Toast Thursday Cheese quesadilla (made with flour tortilla I) Apricots A (fresh if in season or canned (I)) Milk 73 74 Friday High fiber cold cereal I Fresh or frozen berries C Milk 75 Breakfast Raisin toast I Banana C Milk 71 served w/ scrambled egg I Strips I Grapefruit or Vit C fruit C Canned pears C Milk Milk 72 Chili Corn Chip Bake I Lunch/Supper (ground beef (I), pinto beans (I), cheese, taco chips) Frozen corn Seasonal fresh fruit Milk (made with turkey sausage Sandwich I (ground beef (turkey (I), noodles (I)) or chicken (I) and cheese mixture on a Broccoli salad A, C whole wheat bun (I) Romaine and dark green Orange slices C lettuce salad A, C, I Baby Carrots and Milk Raisins A, I Grapes Kiwi Fruit or Vit C fruit Milk Milk 171 172 173 174 A, I chunks, kabobs C Whole wheat crackers I Apple slices C 271 272 Individual Pizzas Crock-pot Cheeseburger Turkey Tetrazzini Ham & Cheese Rollup I (ham/cheese in crescent roll (I) ¾ oz cheese cubes Tomato soup A, C Fresh clementine oranges (A, C) or Vit C fruit Milk 175 Snack Apple Cheese Square C 100% Juice Orange slices & pineapple Pumpkin Patch Muffin 273 Animal Crackers I Strawberries C or seasonal fresh fruit 274 Cucumber coins and carrot sticks A Cottage Cheese Dip 275 Bold font indicates recipe provided. I = Iron source; A = Vitamin A source; C = Vitamin C source 8
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