Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet

Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet free pdf ebook was written by on July 02, 2009 consist of 7 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.litholink.com and available on pdfpedia since January 30, 2012.

1 in this brochure you will find common questions asked about oxalate and kidney stone prevention, and the answers to each of them. your guide to a low oxalate diet ...

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Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet pdf




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Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 1
a Litholink Patient Resource Guide Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet
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Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 2
Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet In this brochure you will find common questions asked about oxalate and kidney stone prevention, and the answers to each of them. 1 “ What is oxalate?” Most oxalate is a waste product made by the body and has no function in humans. The most common type of kidney stone (80%) is made of calcium and oxalate. Other sources of oxalate include: Eating foods high in oxalate Intestinal over absorption (patients who have had intestinal resections due to inflammatory bowel disease or gastric bypass surgery) Excess amounts of vitamin C (2,000 mg or more per day; the excess converts to oxalate) Abnormalities of metabolism 2 “ My urologist told me to cut back on oxalate. My cardiologist told me to eat plenty of vegetables and cut back on fats. What am I supposed to do?” It can be challenging when you have doctors telling you different things. One doctor is worried about your heart (diabetes, hypertension, etc), the other about your kidney stones. You must remember that as with any lifestyle change you should cut back in moderation. It is not reasonable to cut out fruits and vegetables from your diet, as they provide so many important nutrients. Many fruits and vegetables have low oxalate content and can be regularly included in your diet (see list included in this brochure). If you are going to have a high oxalate food, such as a spin- ach salad, just limit the amount of spinach you are having. Also, remember to flush out the extra oxalate you are eating with a glass of water before and after your meal.
Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 3
3 “ When I go on the internet to look up oxalate content of certain foods, I find different sites list different num- bers for the same food. Why is this?” Oxalate content of a single food group varies based on the time of year, the type of soil it is grown in and a host of other factors specific to the growing conditions of the plant which are seldom accounted for in this type of research. 5 “My doctor said that limiting my fat intake will also help lower my ox- alate level. How is this?” For patients who suffer from small bowel disease or malabsorption, it is recommended that dietary fat intake be controlled. Excess fat will bind with calcium in food, thus leaving oxalate by itself to be reabsorbed by the colon and back into the blood stream. If too much oxalate is absorbed, it will combine with calcium in the kidney and can lead to calcium oxalate stones. Your doctor may also prescribe a drug called Cholestyramine. This is a drug taken at each meal that binds fatty acids, bile and oxalate so all three can leave the body. 4 “ What effect does bowel disease and/ or intestinal surgeries with malab- sorption have on my oxalate levels?” There is a definite correlation between patients who suffer from bowel disease and malabsorption problems and the formation of kidney stones. Their urine is more acidic, citrate levels are lower, and oxalate levels are much higher. If you have had an ileal resection you may experience an increase in your oxalate levels due to malabsorption problems. In bowel disease, fatty acids and bile that are nor- mally absorbed by the small intestine reach the colon. When fatty acids and bile reach the colon, they can damage the colon lining allowing oxalate to pass through the damaged lining into the blood, and then into the urine via the kidneys. When calcium and oxalate are together in the kidney, they can bind to- gether to form crystals. These crystals can join together to form calcium oxalate kidney stones. 6 “ My doctor said I am making calcium oxalate stones. Should I cut back on dairy products too?” Unless told otherwise by your doctor, your diet should have between 800 and 1,200 mg of calcium per day. Eating a diet low in calcium is not advised. In fact, studies have shown that eating low calcium diets will increase calcium oxalate stone risk. Oxalate and calcium bind together in your intestine and leave the body together. If you eat a low calcium diet then oxalate has no partner to leave the body with. Oxalate will then be absorbed back into your system leading to higher oxalate levels in your body.
Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 4
7 “ I am lactose intolerant. What can I do to increase my dietary calcium?” Being lactose intolerant is a common problem. You can get calcium from other sources other than dairy products. Cereals and orange juice are now fortified with calcium (see below list). Your doctor may also tell you to take calcium supplements with each meal to help bind with oxalate so it cannot be reabsorbed back into your bloodstream. Non-dairy calcium rich foods Foods containing 50 mg of calcium: Bread Broccoli Kidney beans, lima beans, lentils Orange Tahini Foods containing 75 mg of calcium: Bok choy or kale, cooked Chickpeas Almonds 1⁄2 cup 1 cup 1⁄4 cup 2 slices 3⁄4 cup 1 cup medium 2 tbsp 8 “ Because I am lactose intolerant I eat a lot of soy products. I heard that soy is high in oxalate.” Recent research has concluded that the soy products listed below do have high levels of oxalate and should be eaten in moderation. Serving Size (ounce) Oxalate Content (mg/serving) Textured vegetable protein Soy nuts Soy beverage Tofu with calcium Soy yogurt Tofu with magnesium Soy burger Tempeh Soy cheese 3 1 8.5 3 8.5 3 2.5 3 1 496 392 336 235 113 94 58 23 16 Source: “Oxalate Content of Soybean Seeds, Soy foods, and other Edible Legumes”, LK Massey, Palmer RG, Horner, HT. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, September 2001. Foods containing 250 mg of calcium: Salmon, canned with bones Sardines, canned with bones 1⁄2 can 1⁄2 can
Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 5
Facts Oxalate is made in plants, animals and humans; highest amounts appear in certain plant foods. The function of oxalate is to help plants dispose of excess calcium. Our bodies have no use for oxalate and it is excreted in the urine. Our bodies always have some varying degree of oxalate. About 40-50% of oxalate is from outside sources (foods you eat) and can be much higher on a high oxalate diet. Items listed below contain high levels of oxalate. Items are reported by the milligram of oxalate/100 gm (100 grams is approximately 3.5 ounces). Foods that have less than 50 mg of oxalate per serving should be limited to 4 oz per day. Foods higher than 50 mg of oxalate per serving should be strictly limited. If you do eat some- thing that has a very high oxalate content, make sure you drink a glass of water before and after the product to help flush out the extra oxalate. Cereals and Cereal Products mg of Oxalate /100g Bran Flakes ............................................. 141.0 Cake, fruit ................................................. 11.8 Cake, sponge ............................................... 7.4 Crackers, soybean ................................... 207.0 Fiber One ............................................... 142.0 Grits ......................................................... 41.0 Wheat Germ .......................................... 269.0 White bread .............................................. 14.3 Meats Liver ........................................................... 7.1 Fruits Berries, black ............................................ 18.0 Berries, blue .............................................. 15.0 Berries, Green Goose ................................ 88.0 Berries, raspberries black ........................... 53.0 Berries, raspberries red .............................. 15.0 Berries, strawberries, can .......................... 15.0 Berries, strawberries raw ........................... 10.0 Currants, red ............................................. 19.0 Fruit salad, can .......................................... 12.0 Grapes, concord ........................................ 25.0 Lemon peel .............................................. 83.0 Lime peel .............................................. 110.00 Peaches, Albert ........................................... 5.0 Plums, Damson ........................................ 10.0 Preserves, strawberry jam ............................ 9.4 Prunes, Italian ............................................. 5.8 Rhubarb, can ......................................... 600.00 Rhubarb, stewed, no sugar .................... 800.00
Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 6
Vegetables Asparagus ................................................... 5.2 Beans, green boiled ................................... 15.0 Beetroot, boiled....................................... 675.0 Celery ....................................................... 20.0 Chard, swiss ............................................ 645.0 Collards .................................................... 74.0 Corn, yellow................................................ 5.2 Dandelion greens ...................................... 24.6 Eggplant ................................................... 18.0 Escarole .................................................... 31.0 Kale .......................................................... 13.0 Leek .......................................................... 89.0 Mustard greens ........................................... 7.7 Okra ....................................................... 146.0 Parsley, raw ............................................. 100.0 Parsnips .................................................... 10.0 Pepper, green............................................. 16.0 Potatoes, sweet .......................................... 56.0 Rutabagas ................................................. 19.0 Spinach ................................................... 600.0 Squash, summer ........................................ 22.0 Watercress................................................. 10.0 Confections Chocolate ............................................... 117.0 Butterfinger (candy bar) ............................ 53.5 Marmalade................................................ 10.8 Beverages Tea, Indian; 2 min infusion ....................... 55.0 Tea, Indian; 4 min infusion ....................... 72.0 Tea, Indian; 6 min infusion ....................... 78.0 Juices Cranberry juice ........................................... 6.6 Grape juice.................................................. 5.8 Tomato juice ............................................... 5.5 Miscellaneous Cocoa, dry powder .................................. 623.0 Coffee instant (Nescafe) ........................... 33.0 Ovaltine, powder can ................................ 35.0 Pepper, black ........................................... 419.0 Vegetable soup ............................................ 5.0 Nuts Peanuts, roasted ...................................... 187.0 Peanut butter ............................................ 95.8 Pecans ....................................................... 22.0 © 2005 Litholink Corporation (Physician and patients may copy for non commercial purposes without obtaining permission.)
Your Guide to a Low Oxalate Diet - page 7
If you have any questions, please call us at (800) 338 4333, and ask to speak to a Patient Care Representative. Our hours of operation are Monday – Friday, 7:30am – 6:00pm Central Standard Time. You may also visit our website at www.litholink.com and send any e-mail inquiries to info@litholink.com. Litholink Corporation 2250 West Campbell Park Drive Chicago, Illinois 60612 800 338 4333 Telephone 312 243 3297 Facsimile www.litholink.com V2/LLK0041
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