Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide)

Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) free pdf ebook was written by on May 17, 2007 consist of 51 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.normalbreathing.com and available on pdfpedia since January 12, 2012.

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Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) pdf




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Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 1
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) Simplified theory and practice of breathing, body oxygenation, chronic diseases and breathing retraining Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
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Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 2
-1- “All chronic pain, suffering and diseases are caused from a lack of oxygen at the cell level." Arthur C. Guyton, The Textbook of Medical Physiology*, Fifth Edition. * World’s most widely used medical textbook of any kind * World's best-selling physiology book Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 3
-2- Content of the manual “Amazing DIY Breathing Device” Introduction ..............................................................................................................................................- 4 - Who can use this manual...........................................................................................................................- 5 - Who has special restrictions, limits, and temporary contraindications........................................................- 6 - 1. What is wrong with the breathing of the sick? .......................................................................................- 7 - 1.1 Heart disease ...................................................................................................................................- 7 - 1.2 Asthma............................................................................................................................................- 9 - 1.3 Diabetes ........................................................................................................................................- 10 - 1.4 Other chronic diseases and disorders .............................................................................................- 12 - 2. Parameters of normal breathing ...........................................................................................................- 14 - 2.1 Physiological norms ......................................................................................................................- 14 - 2.2 Other parameters of normal breathing............................................................................................- 15 - 2.3 Myths about breathing and body oxygenation (prevalence: over 90%)...........................................- 15 - 2.4 Do modern healthy people also overbreathe?.................................................................................- 17 - 2.5 What about historical changes in the breathing of ordinary people? ...............................................- 19 - 3. Effects of overbreathing (hyperventilation) .........................................................................................- 23 - 3.1 Hypocapnia (or CO2 deficiency in the blood and cells) .................................................................- 23 - 3.2 Vasoconstriction............................................................................................................................- 23 - 3.3 Suppressed Bohr effect ..................................................................................................................- 26 - 3.4 Less oxygen for cells .....................................................................................................................- 27 - 3.5 Other hypocapnia-related abnormalities.........................................................................................- 27 - 4. How to measure breathing and oxygenation ........................................................................................- 30 - 4.1 How to measure the CP (the index of oxygenation) .......................................................................- 30 - 4.2 MCP (morning CP): your main health parameter ...........................................................................- 32 - 5. How to increase CO2 and CP ..............................................................................................................- 37 - 5.1 Methods suggested by K. P. Buteyko.............................................................................................- 37 - 5.2 Breathing devices ..........................................................................................................................- 37 - 5.3 Are deep breathing and mouth breathing always bad?....................................................................- 38 - 5.4 Factors for success: knowledge, direction and attitude ...................................................................- 39 - 5.5 Restrictions, limits, and temporary contraindications .....................................................................- 39 - 6. How to make and try DIY breathing device.........................................................................................- 42 - 6.1 Required parts and assembling ......................................................................................................- 42 - 6.2 Physiological effects......................................................................................................................- 43 - 6.3 First easy and relaxed attempts ......................................................................................................- 45 - 6.4 Possible problems with your breathing device and their solutions ..................................................- 45 - 7 Requirements for breathing sessions.....................................................................................................- 46 - 7.1 Empty stomach..............................................................................................................................- 46 - 7.2 Hydration ......................................................................................................................................- 46 - 7.3 Thermoregulation ..........................................................................................................................- 46 - 7.4 Clean and fresh air.........................................................................................................................- 46 - 7.5 Posture ..........................................................................................................................................- 46 - 7.6 Diaphragmatic breathing ...............................................................................................................- 47 - 7.7 A quiet place to focus one’s attention ............................................................................................- 49 - 7.8 A ticking clock or watches to monitor seconds ..............................................................................- 49 - 8. First breathing sessions .......................................................................................................................- 50 - 8.1 Are you ready? ..............................................................................................................................- 50 - Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 4
-3- 8.2 Remember your initial breathing ...................................................................................................- 50 - 8.3 First 2-3 minutes or a “warm-up” period........................................................................................- 50 - 8.4 The main part of the lesson............................................................................................................- 51 - 8.5 Duration of one breathing session..................................................................................................- 52 - 8.6 Typical symptoms during the breathing session .............................................................................- 52 - 8.7 Measure and record your parameters after the session....................................................................- 52 - 8.8 Criteria of success .........................................................................................................................- 52 - 8.9 If there is no progress ....................................................................................................................- 52 - 8.10 Which time of the day is best for breathing sessions?...................................................................- 53 - 8.11 Can a session be practiced in the morning after waking up?.........................................................- 53 - 8.12 Total duration of daily breath-work .............................................................................................- 53 - 8.13 Why does my MCP not increase steadily, day after day? .............................................................- 54 - 8.14 How much is a typical weekly MCP increase?.............................................................................- 54 - 8.15 Will I progress steadily up to 2-3 min MCP all the time? .............................................................- 54 - 8.16 Why is a daily log necessary? ......................................................................................................- 54 - 8.17 How to fill your daily log ............................................................................................................- 55 - 9. Breathing retraining program ..............................................................................................................- 56 - 9.1 More challenging breathing exercises ............................................................................................- 56 - 9.2 Breath work and life style factors for over 20 second CP 24/7 .......................................................- 57 - 9.3 Future progress..............................................................................................................................- 59 - 9.4 Final remarks.................................................................................................................................- 60 - 10. Appendixes ......................................................................................................................................- 61 - 10.1 Testimonials of people who tried the DIY breathing device .........................................................- 61 - 10.2 How to maintain nasal breathing 24/7..........................................................................................- 65 - 10.3 How to Prevent Sleeping on One’s Back .....................................................................................- 67 - 10.4 Your personal daily log ...............................................................................................................- 68 - 10.5 About the author Dr. Artour Rakhimov........................................................................................- 69 - Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 5
-4- Introduction Hundreds of medical studies have proved that when we breathe more than the medical norm (hyperventilate), we get less oxygen into our body cells. At the same time, virtually all chronic diseases are based on cellular hypoxia. All available research has also shown that sick people (heart disease, cancer, asthma, bronchitis, COPD, diabetes, and many other chronic conditions) breathe about 2-3 times more than the medical norm. Hence, the solution is to learn how to breathe less. Dr. Konstantin Buteyko developed a method (the Buteyko breathing method) to normalize one’s breathing pattern so that the person learns how to breathe less. As a result of breathing retraining, they experience relief from their symptoms and require less and less medication. Normalization of breathing, as Dr. Buteyko and about 200 his medical colleagues from the former USSR found, means normal body oxygenation and clinical remission of many chronic diseases. I have been teaching the Buteyko method to hundreds of students, mostly in small groups, during the last 7 years. When Buteyko students improve their body oxygenation or CP (control pause), their health is indeed improved. Over 20 second CP means no symptoms and no medication for hypertension, asthma, bronchitis, and many other conditions. However, the main disadvantage of the Buteyko method is that very few people (less than 1% of the sick people) are able to learn the Buteyko breathing exercises from a book or manual. Dr. Buteyko discovered this fact himself already in the 1960s and that is why he started to teach practitioners by choosing and training sick doctors. This disadvantage (necessity of the practitioner or teacher) can be solved using a simple DIY breathing device. How? It is much easier to practice breathing exercises correctly using this DIY breathing device. Although, there are still restrictions, limits, and temporary contraindications, sick people can get a chance to have a better life, and this without learning it from a breathing teacher. In 2009-2010, apart from teaching the Buteyko breathing exercises (reduced breathing) to groups, I also made numerous breathing devices for my students and explained to them how to use these devices. Weeks later I asked these students about their experiences and the efficiency of the DIY devices. The following facts were discovered: 1) My students were able increase their body oxygenation by as much as 5-15 seconds during one breathing session of about 15 minutes. 2) They got greater CP increases in comparison to Buteyko breathing exercises of the same duration. 3) They reported that it was much easier to practice with the device and they achieved more benefits from using the DIY breathing device. 4) However, when these students got up to 30-40 second CP, they usually preferred the reduced breathing exercises developed by Dr. K. Buteyko, since the Buteyko exercises do not require any device and can be practiced anywhere and/or at any time of the day, while being involved in other activities. I still continue to teach both, the Buteyko breathing exercises and the use of the DIY breathing device, since each approach has its advantages. They greatly complement each other. Although I ask my students to practice both types of exercises during the course, I leave it up to my students to decide which exercises they want to practice after the course, this based on their own intuition, sensations, and recorded experience (their daily logs). On average, for the initial stages of breathing retraining, the DIY breathing device is about 40-60% more efficient, in terms of CP (oxygenation) growth, than the typical session of Buteyko reduced breathing of the same duration. In addition, since it is easy to learn and practice, I have decided to share this idea with you. Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 6
-5- Who can use this manual Normal breathing is a fundamental property of the healthy organism. Hence, breathing normalization is the natural way to deal with human body pathologies. While people with cardiovascular, lung, and some other problems require a different approach (see the next sections), this manual can and should be successfully used by people who suffer from any of these symptoms, disorders, and conditions and their combinations: Bones, Joints & Muscles Conditions (arthritis; back & neck pain; Carpal tunnel syndrome; chronic fatigue syndrome & fibromyalgia; elbow pain (bursitis); knee pain; muscular dystrophies; osteoarthritis; osteochondrosis; osteoporosis; polyarthritis; rheumatoid arthritis / joint conditions; radiculitis (nerve root syndrome); scoliosis) Brain & Nervous System (ADD/ADHD; addictions; alcoholism; Alzheimer's disease; anxiety; bipolar disorder; carpal tunnel syndrome; depression; dizziness; eating disorders; encephalitis; epilepsy; obsessive- compulsive disorder; meningitis (viral and bacterial); motor neurone disease, Parkinson's disease; phobias; post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); schizophrenia; senile dementia, social anxiety disorder; vertigo) Cancer (stages 1 and 2; as an additional therapy for a standard complex treatment) Eye disorders (cataracts; far-sightedness; glaucoma; macular degeneration) Gastrointestinal problems (acute and chronic pancreatitis; cholecystitis; Crohn’s disease; chronic gastritis; constipation; duodenal ulcer; gallstone disease; gastric ulcers; heartburn / GERD; hemochromatosis; IBS; IBD; liver cirrhosis; peptic ulcer; spastic colitis; weight loss) Hormonal disorders (adrenal insufficiency; diabetes mellitus type 1; gestational diabetes; hyperthyroidism; hypothyroidism; prediabetes; reactive hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia; obesity) Immune conditions (allergic conjunctivitis; allergies; dermatitis; hay fever; lupus; multiple chemical sensitivities) Other conditions (anemia; cystic fibrosis; hemorrhoids; Raynaud’s disease; thrombophlebitis; varicose veins) Radiation disease Sleep-related problems (bruxism, insomnia; restless leg syndrome; sleep apnoea; snoring) Skin disorders (Acne; diathesis; eczema; psoriasis) Upper respiratory disorders (sinusitis; rhinitis; adenoiditis; polyps; tonsillitis; laryngitis; pharyngitis; tracheitis and other related disorders Urinary and kidney problems (pyelonephritis, glomerulonephritis, kidney stones; nephritis, nocturia; urinary incontinence; urinary tract infections) Viral and bacterial conditions (AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome); bird flu (Avian influenza); cellulitis (bacterial infection); cold; hepatitis A; hepatitis B; hepatitis C; influenza, Lyme disease; rubella (German measles); shingles; West Nile virus). Women’s conditions (cervical erosion; endometriosis; fibroids; fibromyomes; fibrotic mastopathy; irregularities of the menstrual cycle; menopause; sterility; toxicosis of pregnancy; yeast infections) Note that it is impossible to provide a sensible classification of modern health problems (“diseases of civilization”) due to overlaps and possible complex clinical pictures. The explanation for this is that modern medicine does not know the cause of these health problems. This manual suggests that all these conditions have one common cause. Hence, they are not separate disorders, but symptoms of one large disease, which we are going to investigate and address. Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 7
-6- Who has special restrictions, limits, and temporary contraindications Breathing retraining and breathing exercises produce a mild stress for the human body so that it can adapt to new conditions and function better in future. Such adaptive effects take place during, for example, physical exercise. It would be silly for an unfit person to try to run a marathon without rigorous preparation. If the demands due to the exercises are too high, there is no adaptive response, and, as a result, the exercises can even produce a negative effect. Hence, breathing exercises should also be adjusted to the current adaptive abilities of the human organism. For example, people with existing cardiovascular and/or lung problems require certain modifications (individual tailoring) to their breathing retraining. For example, a more gentle approach in relation to hypoxic and hypercapnic demands of breathing exercises (quick changes in air composition) is necessary for many patients with: Heart disease (aortic aneurysms; angina pectoris; arrhythmia; atherosclerosis (plaque buildup); cardiomyopathy; ciliary arhythmia (cardiac fibrillation); chest pain (angina pectoris); high cholesterol; chronic ischemia; congenital heart disease; congestive heart failure; coronary artery disease; endocarditis; extrasystole; heart murmurs; hypertension; hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; tachnycardia; pericarditis; postmyocardial infarction; stroke) Migraine headaches and panic attacks Those people, who have existing problems with their lungs should avoid too fast and too large stretching (expansion or dilation) and shrinking (constriction) of their lungs. Hence, their inhalations and exhalations should be limited (not maximum) in their amplitude and velocity. This relates to people with: Respiratory disorders involving the lungs (asthma, bronchitis, COPD, emphysema, cystic fibrosis, pneumonia, tuberculosis; pulmonary edema; etc.) Other specific situations include: Presence of transplanted organs Pregnancy Brain traumas Acute bleeding injuries Blood clots Acute stages (exacerbations) of life-threatening conditions (infarct, stroke, cardiac ischemia, etc.) Insulin-dependent diabetes (type 2 diabetes) Loss of CO2 sensitivity If you suffer from any of these conditions, you should follow special suggestions (see below) due to restrictions, limits, and temporary contraindications. Warning. Consult your family physician or GP about breathing retraining and use of this breathing device and manual for your specific health problems. Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 8
-7- 1. What is wrong with the breathing of the sick? 1.1 Heart disease Let us start with heart disease. Here are the results of 8 published independent medical studies about breathing rates (minute ventilation) in 8 groups of patients with heart disease. (The graphs are from the website.) Table 1a. Prevalence of CHV (chronic hyperventilation) in patients with heart disease. *One row corresponds to one medical study/publication Minute Number of Prevalence Condition References ventilation patients of CHV Normal breathing - 0% Medical textbooks 6 L/min Heart disease 22 100% Dimopoulou et al, 2001 15 (±4) L/min Heart disease 11 100% Johnson et al, 2000 16 (±2) L/min Heart disease 132 100% Fanfulla et al, 1998 12 (±3) L/min Heart disease 55 100% Clark et al, 1997 15 (±4) L/min Heart disease 15 100% Banning et al, 1995 13 (±4) L/min Heart disease 88 100% Clark et al, 1995 15 (±4) L/min Heart disease 30 100% Buller et al, 1990 14 (±2) L/min Heart disease 20 100% Elborn et al, 1990 16 (±6) L/min Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 9
-8- We can see that heart patients breathe too much. What is wrong with this? If heart patients breathe more air than the medical norm, it is logical that their heart muscle gets less blood and oxygen supply (see explanation in the next section). Should these heart patients slow their breathing back to the norm, heart perfusion and oxygenation, state of blood vessels, and many other key parameters would again become normal. This would result in the disappearance of the symptoms of heart disease and no more need for medication. References (in the same order) Dimopoulou I, Tsintzas OK, Alivizatos PA, Tzelepis GE, Pattern of breathing during progressive exercise in chronic heart failure, Int J Cardiol. 2001 Dec; 81(2-3): p. 117-121. Intensive Care Unit and Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens, Greece. Johnson BD, Beck KC, Olson LJ, O'Malley KA, Allison TG, Squires RW, Gau GT, Ventilatory constraints during exercise in patients with chronic heart failure, Chest 2000 Feb; 117(2): p. 321-332. Divisions of Cardiovascular Health, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Fanfulla F, Mortara , Maestri R, Pinna GD, Bruschi C, Cobelli F, Rampulla C, The development of hyperventilation in patients with chronic heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration, Chest 1998; 114; p. 1083-1090. Respiratory Function Laboratory, IRCCS, S. Maugeri Foundation, Montescano Medical Center, Pavia, Italy. Clark AL, Volterrani M, Swan JW, Coats AJS, The increased ventilatory response to exercise in chronic heart failure: relation to pulmonary pathology, Heart 1997; 77: p.138-146. Departnent of Cardiac Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK. Banning AP, Lewis NP, Northridge DB, Elbom JS, Henderson AH, Perfusion/ventilation mismatch during exercise in chronic heart failure: an investigation of circulatory determinants, Br Heart J 1995; 74: p.27-33. Department of Cardiology, College of Medicine, University of Wales, Cardiff, UK. Clark AL, Chua TP, Coats AJ, Anatomical dead space, ventilatory pattern, and exercise capacity in chronic heart failure, Br Heart J 1995 Oct; 74(4): p. 377-380. Department of Cardiac Medicine, National Heart and Lung Institute, London, UK. Buller NP, Poole-Wilson PA, Mechanism of the increased ventilatory response to exercise in patients with chronic heart failure, Heart 1990; 63; p.281-283. The National Heart and Lung Institute and National Heart Hospital, London, UK. Elborn JS, Riley M, Stanford CF, Nicholls DP, The effects of flosequinan on submaximal exercise in patients with chronic cardiac failure, Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1990 May; 29(5): p.519-524. Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, Northern Ireland. Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
Breathing Retraining Manual (Instructional Guide) - page 10
-9- 1.2 Asthma Let us look at MV (minute ventilation) in patients with asthma at rest. Here again, the breathing rates relate to the state of patients when they do not have any acute episodes or symptoms of their disease, since during exacerberations, chronically sick people breathe even more. Table 1b. Western scientific evidence about the prevalence of CHV (chronic hyperventilation) in patients with asthma. *One row corresponds to one medical study/publication Minute Number of Prevalence Condition References ventilation patients of CHV Normal breathing - 0% Medical textbooks 6 L/min Asthma 16 100% Chalupa et al, 2004 13 (±2) L/min Asthma 8 100% Johnson et al, 1995 15 L/min Asthma 39 100% Bowler et al, 1998 14 (±6) L/min Asthma 17 100% Kassabian et al, 1982 13 (±4) L/min Asthma 101 100% McFadden & Lyons, 1968 12 L/min Copyrights: Artour Rakhimov 2010, PhD; www.NormalBreathing.com
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