Design Guidance: Office Space

Design Guidance: Office Space free pdf ebook was written by on November 07, 2003 consist of 40 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.uc.edu and available on pdfpedia since January 10, 2012.

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Design Guidance: Office Space pdf




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Design Guidance: Office Space - page 1
Design Guidance: Office Space Division of the University Architect September 2003
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Design Guidance: Office Space - page 2
Table of Contents INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................3 H ISTORY ....................................................................................................................3 Integration with Master Plan Initiatives and Strategies ................................................4 Integration of Quality of Life Standards for All Students, Faculty, and Staff ................4 Integration with Industry .........................................................................................5 Integration of Responsible Use of Funds and Resources..............................................5 O BJECTIVES ...............................................................................................................6 SPACE PLANNING ......................................................................................................7 G OVERNING P HILOSOPHY FOR O FFICE S PACE P LANNING ..................................................7 O THER O FFICE S PACES ................................................................................................8 O RGANIZING P RINCIPLES .............................................................................................8 Planning Principles .................................................................................................8 Other Considerations...............................................................................................8 R EQUIREMENTS FOR D ESIGN S UBMISSIONS .....................................................................9 C OMPLIANCE I SSUES AND S PECIAL R EQUIREMENTS .........................................................9 SPACE STANDARDS.................................................................................................10 O FFICE T YPES ..........................................................................................................10 D ESIGN E LEMENTS ....................................................................................................10 Furniture..............................................................................................................10 Finishes ...............................................................................................................10 S TANDARD S PACE S IZES AND F INISHES ........................................................................10 A VAILABLE O FFICE L AYOUTS ....................................................................................12 P RINCIPLES FOR V ARIANCES .......................................................................................38 Variance Requests During Design ..........................................................................38 Variance Requests After Occupancy .......................................................................38 BIBLIOGRAPHY........................................................................................................39 Illustrations Available Office Layouts Optional Office Furniture Panel Height Options (in example 8’ x 8’ workstation) University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 2
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 3
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Introduction Introduction The University of Cincinnati’s “Design Guidance: Office Space” was developed as a reference for University personnel, Associate Architects, furniture dealerships, furniture manufacturers, and contractor personnel who are involved in the design, furnishing, construction, and/or use of new and renovated office areas. It presents guidance for the allocation and design of office space at the University. The guidance was developed through research of office environments in both higher education and industry, utilizing campus planners, architects, and interior designers who have extensive experience in designing many different kinds of office space. The team obtained information from a variety of sources, including: § § § § § A comprehensive review of university personnel classifications A review of comparative information about office standards at other universities Visits to other campuses Input from professional design teams with a diverse range of experience Input obtained from presentations made at professional conferences History The need for a comprehensive set of standards for the allocation and design of all University office space has become apparent, and the precedent for this has been established. The concepts embedded in these standards have been applied to University Hall, University Pavilion, The Student Life Center, and other projects at the University. With increasing application, these concepts have been refined, and have been developed into this document. The University now has an opportunity to take advantage of the knowledge gained from these recent applications. By applying this knowledge across the board, the University can realize the benefits a high-quality office environment can deliver in terms of recruitment, retention, and increased fiscal effectiveness. This comprehensive level of thinking is commensurate with the concepts embedded within the Master Plan; further, it integrates the same attention to the interior details of the workplace as has been given to our MainStreet and other Master Plan initiatives. A standard policy for the equitable allocation and design of office space at the University of Cincinnati is consistent with the strategies of the Master Plan. The policy also is not without precedent, as is outlined below. University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 3
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 4
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Introduction Integration with Master Plan Initiatives and Strategies The Master Plan contains several initiatives that support the desire for universally applied office space standards: § § § The 1991 Edition introduced the concept of Connective Strategy, emphasizing, among other points, the celebration of innovation. The 1995 Edition added the Three Imperatives, of which one is to provide new academic and research space and facilities on campus. The 1995 Edition added a Fourth Imperative, Quality of Student Life and Services. Among other goals, this imperative includes the attraction and retention of top-quality students, and the creation of a physical environment reflecting the idea that learning takes place at all times, in a range of places in and beyond the classroom. Specifically, the Master Plan points out: “A strong campus community, fostered by an attractive and cohesive, interconnected physical environment, with a high quality of student services, is critical for the University to remain competitive academically.” The quality of the work environment — where students will interact with university employees and faculty — contributes extensively to the ability to recruit and retain top-quality students, faculty, and staff. The scope of this vision, therefore, is naturally recognized to include the interiors of our buildings and the furnishings within. Such conclusions have been applied to date in the construction and renovation of facilities. In keeping with the overriding goals of the Master Plan, the University recognizes that the quality of the university’s office space and the furnishings within must continue to be brought up to par, in a similar fashion as its academic, research, and open space. Integration of Quality of Life Standards for All Students, Faculty, and Staff The University of Cincinnati is one of the largest employers in the Cincinnati region, with an equally significant economic impact. In this capacity, the University employs over 13,000 full- and part-time faculty, staff, and students — dispersed over a wide range of research, academic, and administrative disciplines and functions. As the University continues to improve the quality of its facilities and assets, the same concepts applied to recent projects should be applied. To follow our policy of improving academic, student, and research facilities, along with open space, to the same level of quality, we need to follow a similar path in the design of future facilities — from the purchase or replacement of furniture, to building renovations, to the design of new buildings. The University has the opportunity to benefit from the impact of well-crafted space and interiors. It is known that students base their decision to attend a university on the first few University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 4
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 5
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Introduction minutes of a campus visit. The quality of the work environment is recognized to play a part in a job candidate’s decision to work for a particular employer. The impressions on surrounding communities have lasting impacts. The growing policy toward open access and broader use of facilities emphasizes the role departments have as ambassadors for the university. An ordered and systematic method for allocating space and furnishings focuses attention to quality, from the space to the workstation. Such an approach also helps the University remain competitive in recruitment and retention. These concepts have been applied to such recent projects as Braunstein Hall, Baldwin Hall, Swift Hall, The Student Life Center, University Hall, and University Pavilion, among others. Integration with Industry The concepts of value-based asset management and universal application of space standards have been in place in industry for many years. Within higher education, the application of space and furniture standards has grown, with many universities implementing a codified method for allocating and designing office space. In addition, as the University continues to adapt to further reductions in state funding, there is heightened emphasis on retaining a unified identity as an institution. Space standards help achieve this. Benchmarking The University’s office space standards have been extensively measured against those found in similar offices across the United States. While developing these standards, the University sought policy information about typical square footage, office types, etc., for similar spaces in other public institutions and in private industry. Beginning in March 2003, the Office of Campus Planning and Design assembled a list of public universities and businesses comparable to UC in size and mission. Design professionals at these comparable institutions were then questioned about the space standards and philosophy in place in their offices. Not all institutions responded with complete information; many have not developed space standards of their own. However, the data available did indicate that UC’s standard office sizes, furniture selections, and finish levels are similar to, or even more generous than, those found in other, similar businesses. Integration of Responsible Use of Funds and Resources Equitability, value, quality, function, and flexibility are all important goals that office space and furniture should support. First cost is not the only cost to be acknowledged in determining value to the University. Selecting materials that may have a higher price point, but that reduce maintenance over time is a concept in use at the University of Cincinnati. As an example of this, the recent purchase of new field turf surfaces for the football stadium, the soccer field, and other fields that students will use has been very successful, allowing both University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 5
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 6
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Introduction specific and general recreational use, and reducing fears of wear and tear. Similarly, the furniture for University Hall, University Pavilion, the Student Life Center, and other recent projects was chosen and purchased for its ability to support a variety of job descriptions and for the ease with which it can be reconfigured in the future, as well as for its quality and durability. By virtue of larger quantities and industry-proven performance, furniture of a median or higher price point could be procured for greater reduced cost, increasing the purchasing power of the University. Dedicated budget line items for furniture and interior design have been in place at the University on all major projects, and it is concluded that furniture purchases, renovation projects, and new construction will include a separately identified budget allocation for interiors and office furniture commensurate with the standards herein. In support of the above, the standards contained in this document have been established. Objectives The guidance presented here supports the following objectives: § § § § § § § § § To provide a quality environment for the University’s high-quality employees and services, thus enhancing job satisfaction among staff members To foster the recruitment and retention of top-quality employees and students To create functional, efficient workspaces for staff performing diverse duties in a variety of settings To encourage interaction and teamwork among members of each department To promote creativity and innovation in the office environment To convey workplace equality through equitable and consistent distribution and quality of space and furniture resources throughout the University To apply a consistent and professional look to office environments across all campuses To simplify asset management To better utilize financial resources through a work environment designed for long-term quality, interchangeability and flexibility; ergonomics based in research; and longevity and depth of product University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 6
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 7
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Space Planning Space Planning In the last 10 to 15 years, changes in work and work processes have brought about a gradual but dramatic shift in the way office spaces are designed. With computer technology continuing to advance, offices must deliver maximum connectivity. Business objectives often require employees to work collaboratively, so office designs must promote interaction between co-workers. “Repurposing” of space is commonplace, so designs must minimize costs by providing the flexibility for possible new configurations. And human factors such as the need for natural light, privacy, and comfort are recognized as being essential to productivity. Against that backdrop, UC has established a governing philosophy and a set of organizing principles for space planning that facilitate the design of contemporary, ergonomic, and optimally functional work environments. Governing Philosophy for Office Space Planning The following three elements will guide the design of office space at UC: a) Co-location of related functions. This approach places people in related jobs close to one another on the office floor. As an example, administrative assistants’ work spaces are located near those of the personnel they support. Reducing the reduced need for foot travel throughout the floor has a positive impact on time efficiency and productivity. b) Sharing of spaces by multiple departments or by all personnel in a building. Examples of spaces that can be shared include conference or breakout rooms, training facilities, reception areas, photocopying/printing/mail distribution areas, work-related storage space, and kitchens or break rooms. By designing these areas to be shared among groups, the University makes the best use of expensive “fitted out” space (i.e., space equipped with phone and data jacks, conferencing capability, etc.). The sharing approach also results in more available square footage for assignment to employees. c) Use of modular furniture systems in office layouts. Modular furniture systems deliver flexibility and efficiencies of cost and space. They can be either freestanding or panel-mounted (for example, overhead storage shelves mounted on cubicle walls). This type of furniture also establishes a consistent, professional appearance throughout a building. Both individual work areas and shared spaces will be designed with modular furniture, including areas where built-in components such as cabinets and counter tops are being considered. (The section “Office Layouts” in this University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 7
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 8
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Space Planning document shows floor plans for different job functions and the furniture systems, components, and sizes typically found in each.) Other Office Spaces Conference rooms should have the capacity for 12 or more people. Breakout rooms should have capacity for 8 or more people. Note: Rooms with capacity for 20 or more have specific audiovisual requirements. Please refer to “Design Guidance: Learning Environments” for specifics. Organizing Principles The University’s organizing principles for office space were developed to provide guidance for assigning office types and space allocations, and to address other considerations related to occupant comfort and productivity. Planning Principles In programming a new office, designers must follow these principles: § Employees are assigned either an open office (with moveable partitions surrounding a portion of the space) or a closed office (with fixed walls and a door). Assignment is determined by job category. The table in the section “Space and Finish Standard” presents the standard office assignments by category. Net assignable square footage (NASF) for each employee is also determined by job category. Standard NASF amounts are also shown on the table in the section “Space and Finish Standard”. To provide views and daylight for a majority of occupants, designers should avoid placing closed offices along exterior walls whenever possible. When practicable, exterior corners should be reserved for conference rooms, multi-purpose rooms, or the offices of senior-level administrators. Locating senior staff in proximity to people with whom they have functional relationships is a priority. § § § Other Considerations Technology and electricity: A standard work station is equipped with one voice and one data jack. Three duplex power outlets are provided, one for computers and the others for convenience. Any requests for variations from the standard work stations will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 8
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 9
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Space Planning In lieu of in-building surge protection, power circuits should be segregated as follows: 1. Computer 2. Convenience 3. Specialty equipment (i.e., photocopiers, fax machines, laser printers, etc.) 4. Work station task lighting Noise management: As much as possible, design should minimize noise by placing the majority of work spaces away from the floor’s main traffic flow. Organizations must be separated from one another by sound-isolated, floor-to-deck partitions. Temporary/interim space: Design of temporary space need not follow the guidance presented in this document. Such spaces must be designed with economy and flexibility in mind. Requirements for Design Submissions Designers must follow the “Design Phase Submission Requirements” outlined in the University’s Design Guidelines and Standards Manual, as well as the Office of the University Architect (OUA) publication “Interior Design and Furniture Acquisition.” For interior design of office spaces, specific requirements include: § Schematic Design (SD): Floor plans showing spatial design elements and the proposed furniture layout. A preliminary budget must be submitted for review and approval. Design Development (DD): Required coordinations with architectural and MEP disciplines; material, finish, and product selections; color boards with outline specifications; updated budget. Construction Documents (CD): Updated choices and product lead times. § § Compliance Issues and Special Requirements The University requires that all offices achieve full compliance with building and fire codes. Full compliance with all applicable provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is also a requirement. The criteria contained in this guidance meet or exceed Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG), fire, life safety, and other related building codes, as applicable, as of April 2003. Designers are to incorporate subsequent changes if they are more stringent. University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 9
Design Guidance: Office Space - page 10
Design Guidance: Office Space September 2003 Space Standards Space Standards Space standards were established to create uniformity and efficiency in the University’s work environments. The standards encourage designers and other stakeholders to think in terms of adaptability for future reconfigurations. Inherently, the standards also discourage designs that dedicate space to infrequent or “luxury” uses. Office Types As stated previously, the open office environment offers numerous advantages that are validated by industry research. Open environments promote creativity, collaboration, and flexibility, among other benefits. Closed offices will be allocated to people in positions of director and above. All other employees will be located in open offices. Design Elements Furniture Modular furniture is the standard for all office space. Designers are to specify standard product lines and components for a look and quality that match throughout an organization. Stand-alone office furniture, or “case goods,” will be evaluated by the University Architect for specialty conditions only. Finishes The selection of finish materials and colors for a public space (i.e., one visited by students, parents, community members, etc.) must be approved by the Office of the University Architect and must follow the selection process presented in “Interior Design and Furniture Acquisition.” For non-public spaces, selections should remain within the University’s approved color guidelines and furniture standards. Standard Space Sizes and Finishes The table on the following page shows the office type (open/closed), square footage allotment, and furniture/finish for each job category. Standard finishes are shown in the table on the following page. University of Cincinnati Division of the University Architect 10
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