What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators

What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators free pdf ebook was written by on December 29, 2010 consist of 28 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.nyc.gov and available on pdfpedia since January 04, 2012.

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What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators pdf




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What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators - page 1
What to Expect When You’re Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators December 2010 Michael R. Bloomberg Mayor Thomas Farley, M.D., M.P.H. Commissioner
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What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators - page 2
What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators - page 3
What to Expect When You’re Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Food Safety Requires Active Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 The Food Protection Course and Certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 The Quality Improvement Food Protection Course and Certificate . . . . . . . .3 The Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Scored Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 n Critical and General Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Condition Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 n Unscored Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Inspection Report and Notice of Violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Closings and Re-openings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Restaurant Inspection Website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Grading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Every Restaurant Can Achieve an “A” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Food Service Establishment Inspection Scoring Parameters: A Guide to Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Critical Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 General Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Self-Inspection Worksheet for Food Service Establishments Special foldout section after page 12
What to Expect When You're Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators - page 4
What to Expect When You’re Inspected: A Guide for Food Service Operators Introduction he New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (Health Department) inspects approximately 26,000 food service establishments (sometimes called “restaurants” here) each year to monitor their compliance with city and state food safety regulations . This guide reviews the inspection process, provides information on the restaurant grading program, and includes the Food Service Establishment Self-Inspection Worksheet (after page 12) and Food Service Establishment Inspection Scoring Parameters: A Guide to Conditions (page 8). All food workers, including wait staff, should know how to prepare and handle food safely, to prevent food- related illnesses . Owners and managers should study this guide, share it with their employees, and use the Self-Inspection Worksheet (after page 14) to regularly check their restaurants’ physical and environmental conditions and their employees’ food-handling practices . The regulations governing these Health Department inspections are in the Rules of the City of New York, Title 24, Chapter 23, titled “Food Service Establishment Inspection Procedures .” T Food Safety Requires Active Management Operators who monitor their sanitary practices daily and correct violations on their own are more likely to do well on inspections . The Health Department encourages all operators to take advantage of its online resources and classroom courses to learn how to practice food safety and conduct self-inspections to manage and avoid Health Code violations . The Food Protection Course and Certificate To promote active management, the Health Code requires food service establishments to have a supervisor of food operations with a Food Protection Certificate on duty during all hours of operation to supervise food preparation and processing . To avoid gaps in supervision, the Health Department recommends that restaurants have more than one staff person with a Food Protection Certificate . Individuals can earn a Certificate by taking and passing the Health Department’s food protection course, which trains operators in food safety and regulatory requirements . Classes are offered in multiple languages at the department’s Health Academy and online in English, Chinese and Spanish (nyc .gov/html/doh/html/ hany/hanyfood-online .shtml) . The Academy course runs over five half days, Monday through Friday, with an exam held on the last day . The online course can be taken at any time, but the final exam must be taken at the Health Academy . Department-approved food protection classes are also offered by the City University of New York and the New York State Restaurant Association . Supervisors who have passed one of these classes are eligible to earn a certificate after taking an abbreviated course at the Health Academy and passing a test . nyc.gov/html/doh/ html/hany/hanyfood-online.shtml 2 NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators
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Quality Improvement Food Protection Course and Certificate Anyone with a Food Protection Certificate is eligible to enroll in the advanced Quality Improvement Food Protection Course, which teaches managers how to improve management and identify “critical control points”—steps during the food handling and preparation process when safety hazards can be prevented, eliminated or reduced . The course provides hands-on instruction and practical quality-control information . Topics include how to: n Recognize and correct food safety violations Keep potentially hazardous food safe Develop a maintenance and cleaning schedule Maintain proper personal hygiene practices Train employees effectively n n n n The course consists of two four-hour sessions held on consecutive days and one follow-up session held about a week later . At the first session, each participant receives a tool kit for designing and implementing a quality improvement plan tailored to his/her individual establishment . The course and the implementation of a quality improvement plan a week later provide the support food service establishments need to achieve and maintain the highest standards in food safety . The Inspection Every food service establishment in New York City receives an unannounced, onsite inspection at least once a year to check if it is meeting Health Code food safety requirements . The inspector may visit anytime the restaurant is receiving or preparing food or drink, or is open to the public . Health Department inspectors hold bachelors’ degrees with significant coursework in science . All inspectors undergo months of intense public health and communications instruction before they conduct an inspection on their own . They are taught to identify and explain to operators what hazards contribute to food-borne illnesses and to document these accurately in an inspection report . It is a crime to offer—or for the inspector to demand—money, gifts, or services of any kind . Legal action will be taken against anyone who offers or accepts a bribe . To report a bribe, or attempted bribe, call the Inspector General’s office at (212) 825-2141 . Scored Violations The inspector records observed violations in a handheld computer during the inspection . Each violation is associated with a range of points depending on the type and extent of the violation, and the risk it poses to the public . At the end of the inspection, the points are added together for an inspection score . Lower inspection scores indicate better compliance with the Health Code . NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators 3
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Critical and General Violations Health Code violations are classified as “critical” or “general” (see the Self-Inspection Worksheet for Food Service Establishments after page 12) . Critical violations are more likely than general ones to contribute to food-borne illnesses because they may be a substantial risk to the public’s health . Critical violations are given more points than general violations . Failing to cook food to required temperatures is a critical violation, while failing to provide an accurate thermometer in a refrigerator is a general violation . “Public health hazards” are critical violations that pose an immediate health threat . Due to their serious nature, they carry the most points . If an establishment does not correct a public health hazard before the end of the inspection, the Health Department may close it immediately . “Pre-permit serious items” are critical violations in the design of an establishment, such as improper sewage disposal or lack of a hand-washing facility near the food preparation area . The Health Department will not issue a permit if the establishment has one of these conditions . These violations must be corrected before the restaurant opens, or immediately if the establishment is already open to the public . Because these violations are critical to safe design and operation of the food service establishment, they carry the most points . TIP: Critical and general violations are listed in the Self-Inspection Worksheet included in this booklet. Public health hazards are marked with an asterisk (*) and pre-permit serious violations are marked with a plus sign (+). Condition Levels The number of points an establishment receives for a critical or general violation depends on its condition level, meaning the extent and frequency of the violation . Every condition level is determined by a specific set of parameters (see Page 8, Food Service Establishment Inspection Scoring Parameters – A Guide to Conditions) . Some violations have more condition levels and parameters than others . Conditions range from Level I, which carries the fewest points, to Level V, which carries the most points . For example, the presence of one contaminated food item would constitute a Condition Level I violation and would generate the fewest critical violation points . Four or more different contaminated food items would be a Condition Level IV violation, and the operator would be assessed more violation points . Condition Level V, in most instances, is used to score public health hazards that are not corrected at the time of the inspection and is usually assigned 28 points . Unscored Violations Some cited violations may result in a Notice of Violation, fine and/or follow-up inspection, but are not counted toward the inspection score (see the Self-Inspection Worksheet for Food Service Establishments after page 12) . 44 NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators
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The Inspection Report and Notice of Violation At the end of the inspection, the inspector will: n Review the results of the sanitary inspection with the operator, explain violations and suggest ways to correct them and improve food safety . Cited violations should be corrected as soon as possible, and the establishment should take steps to prevent them from recurring . Issue a printed Inspection Report that states what the inspector observed, the violation points and the inspection score . Issue a Notice of Violation if a critical violation was cited, the score was 14 or more points in general violations, or if an unscored violation was cited . This notice is signed by the inspector and the food service operator . Provide the date when the Notice of Violation will be heard by a hearing examiner at the Department’s Administrative Tribunal . The back of the Notice of Violation includes contact information for the Tribunal, a description of the hearing process and information about settlement and hearing by mail . Fines are determined at the Tribunal . They range from $200 to $2,000 per violation and may be higher for repeated violations . n n n TIP: Use the Self-Inspection Worksheet and Guide to Conditions in this booklet to conduct regular self-inspections. These worksheets provide examples of the violations inspectors look for and the points they assign for each. By regularly identifying and immediately correcting violations in your establishment, you not only protect your customers but improve your chances of a successful inspection. Closings and Re-openings The Health Department may order a restaurant to temporarily close to correct a public health hazard that cannot be corrected before the end of an inspection or when the restaurant is operating without a valid permit . A restaurant may also be closed if it scores 28 or more points on three consecutive inspections . Prior to closure, an inspector will contact a supervisor, who will determine whether to order the establishment closed . If it is closed, Health Department closure signs must be immediately posted in the window(s) and/or door(s), all operations must cease, and the restaurant must remain closed for business until it is authorized by the Health Department to reopen . The Department will monitor the establishment to ensure it remains closed and issues additional violations for not complying with the closing order . To reopen, the establishment must submit a written statement to the Health Department indicating that it has corrected all the violations that led to its being closed . The operator may be asked to attend an informal meeting with Health Department supervisors . If it appears that sanitary conditions have improved, an inspector will conduct a reopening inspection while the establishment remains closed to the public . Health Department supervisors will determine whether it may reopen . After re-opening, the establishment will be inspected for compliance with the Health Code . If it is in sufficient compliance, it may remain open and will be inspected again in about three months . Repeated violations may prompt the Health Department to initiate procedures for the revocation or suspension of the operator’s permit at a hearing before the New York City Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings . This may result in the establishment being closed for a longer period of time, or permanently . NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators 5
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Restaurant Inspection Website Consumers may check an establishment’s inspection history . Restaurant scores, grades and the details of inspection results are available on the Health Department’s searchable restaurant inspection website at nyc .gov/health/restaurant . Grading As of July 2010, certain types of food service establishments—including restaurants, coffee shops, bars, nightclubs, and most cafeterias and fixed-site food stands—must post letter grades that correspond to their sanitary inspection scores . A score of 0-13 results in a grade of A; 14-27 points, a B; and 28 or more points, a C . Letter grades are not issued to mobile food vending units, temporary food service establishments, food service establishments operated by primary or secondary schools, hospital-operated cafeterias, correctional facilities, charitable organizations (including soup kitchens or other prepared food distribution programs) or food service establishments operated by not-for-profit membership organizations that serve food only to their members . TIP: Restaurants with A grades are inspected less often than those with B or C grades. Score 0 to 13 points = A; Score 14 to 27 points = B; Score 28 or more points = C Only certain inspections result in a grade . Every food service establishment is scheduled for at least one inspection per year . A restaurant that scores 0 to 13 violation points on its first inspection will receive an A-grade card that must be posted immediately . An establishment that does not score an A on its initial inspection will not have to post a grade until it has had the opportunity to improve its sanitary conditions and is re-inspected . If an A is issued on re-inspection, the A grade card must be posted immediately . An establishment receiving a B or C grade on re-inspection receives two cards: one showing the letter grade and one that says Grade Pending; one of those cards must be posted immediately . The final grade is determined at the Administrative Tribunal . The frequency of inspections depends on a restaurant’s score . Restaurants with A grades are inspected less often than those with B or C grades . Frequent inspections of poorer-performing establishments enable the Health Department to closely monitor their food safety practices, while giving them more opportunities to improve their grades . The letter grade or “Grade Pending” card must be posted in a place where it is easily seen by people passing by . It must be on the front window, door or an outside-facing wall . The card must be within five feet from the front door or other entrance, and within six feet from the ground or floor . SANITARY INSPECTION GRADE Card Number Establishment Name Date Issued For additional information or a copy of an inspection report, call 311 or visit nyc.gov/health SANITARY INSPECTION GRADE Card Number Establishment Name Date Issued For additional information or a copy of an inspection report, call 311 or visit nyc.gov/health For additional information on grading and the schedule of how often food establishments are inspected, visit nyc .gov/html/doh/html/rii/foodservice .shtml . 6 NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators
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EVERY RESTAURANT CAN ACHIEVE AN Avoid Common Sanitary Violations Follow the steps below to practice A-grade food safety and keep your customers safe from food-borne illness. Avoid the most commonly cited violations and improve your chances to achieve an “A.” Be sure employees are trained in basic food safety and supervised by someone who has a food protection certificate. n Protect food from contamination during storage, preparation, transportation and display. n n Arrange work schedules so that a supervisor with a food protection certificate is on duty whenever your restaurant is receiving or preparing food, or is open to the public . Train supervisors to use the Self-Inspection Worksheet to regularly evaluate and improve the restaurant’s condition and employees’ food safety practices . Provide food safety training for all employees who handle food . Keep food covered until served . Keep food separated by temperature and type . Avoid cross-contamination by separating potentially hazardous foods (like raw poultry) from ready-to-eat items (like salad mix) . n Maintain all food surfaces. n n Clean and sanitize all food-preparation surfaces after each use; remove caked-on food . Repair or replace deeply-grooved cutting boards and chipped or broken surfaces so they can be properly sanitized . Hold food at the proper temperature. n n Review Health Department rules for temperature- holding requirements . Be sure equipment used to hold hot and cold food is working properly . Use thermometers to monitor the temperature of foods in hot or cold storage . Track food taken from hot or cold storage, and record how long it is out . n Maintain all non-food surfaces. n n Review Health Department rules on acceptable materials; surfaces should be smooth and cleanable . Keep all surfaces clean . n n Maintain all plumbing and check it frequently. n Control conditions that promote pests. n Seal all cracks, crevices and holes in walls, cabinets and doors to prevent rodents, cockroaches and flies from entering . Install rodent-proof door sweeps on outside doors . Store food and garbage in pest-proof containers . Clean grease, oil and food particles from all surfaces and equipment, including the floor underneath . Keep range hoods clean and grease-free . Contract with a pest control professional licensed to work in restaurants . Monitor all plumbing fixtures and make needed repairs immediately . Be sure plumbing is fitted with approved devices (valves, anti-siphonage pieces, vacuum breakers) to prevent backflow . Clean and maintain grease traps . n n n n n n n Michael R. Bloomberg Mayor Thomas Farley, M.D., M.P.H. Commissioner NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators 7
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FOOD SERVI CE ESTABL ISHM E NT INSP E CT I ON S C OR IN G PAR AM E TER S: A GU I D E TO C O N DI TI O N S CRI T I C A L V I O L AT I O N S VIOLATION 2A* Food not cooked to CONDITION I CONDITION II CONDITION III CONDITION IV CONDITION V 8 NYC DOHMH – A Guide for Food Service Operators 2C 2D required minimum temperature . Failure to properly cook meats, comminuted meats and other potentially hazardous foods (PHFs), unless a consumer specifically asks for a serving of item ordered to be cooked below the minimum temperature . One hot food item out of temperature in one area . Example: one tray of chicken wings held at 115°F . Two hot food items out of temperature or the same type of food out of temperature in two different areas . Example: one tray of chicken wings and a pot of rice held at 115°F; or one tray of chicken wings on the steam table and one tray of chicken wings in the food preparation area held at 115°F . Three hot food items out of temperature or the same type of food out of temperature in three different areas . Example: one tray of chicken wings, a pot of rice and platter of roast beef held at 115°F; or one tray of chicken wings on the steam table, one tray of chicken wings in the food preparation area and one basket of chicken near the deep fryer held at 115°F . Four or more hot food items out of temperature or the same type of food out of temperature in four or more different areas . Example: one tray of chicken wings, a pot of rice, platter of roast beef and tureen of beef stew held at 115°F; or one tray of chicken wings on the steam table, one tray of chicken wings in the food preparation area, one basket of chicken near the deep fryer and a rotisserie machine filled with eleven chickens held at 115°F . Four or more cooked and refrigerated hot food items not reheated to 165°F before service . Example: chicken soup, baked ham, sliced turkey, meatloaf and lobster bisque . Four or more pre-cooked commercially prepared foods not heated to 140°F . Example: beef patties, clam chowder, smoked turkey, corned beef and gyros . Failure to correct any condition of a PHH at the time of inspection . Inspector must call office to discuss closing or other enforcement measures . 2B* Hot food item not held at or above 140°F . Failure to correct any condition of a PHH at the time of inspection . Inspector must call office to discuss closing or other enforcement measures . Hot food item that has been cooked and refrigerated is being held for service without first being reheated to 165°F or above within 2 hours . Precooked potentially hazardous food from commercial food processing establishment that is supposed to be heated, but is not heated to 140°F within 2 hours . One cooked and refrigerated hot food item not reheated to 165°F before service . Example: chicken soup . Two cooked and refrigerated hot food items not reheated to 165°F before service . Example: chicken soup and baked ham . Three cooked and refrigerated hot food items not reheated to 165°F before service . Example: chicken soup, baked ham and sliced turkey . One precooked commercially prepared food not heated to 140°F . Example: beef patties . Two pre-cooked commercially prepared foods not heated to 140°F . Example: beef patties and clam chowder . Three pre-cooked commercially prepared foods not heated to 140°F . Example: beef patties, clam chowder and smoked turkey . * Public Health Hazards (PHH) must be corrected immediately + Pre-permit Serious (PPS) Violations that must be corrected before permit is issued
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