Javorek "Complex" Conditioning

Javorek "Complex" Conditioning free pdf ebook was written by Randy's HD on August 24, 2004 consist of 10 page(s). The pdf file is provided by istvanjavorek.com and available on pdfpedia since December 08, 2011.

istvan "steve" javorek born: szekelyhid (sacueni), romania •professor fitness and all-sports conditioning head coach, weightlifting club head coach johnson county ...

x
send send what is readshare?


Thank you for helping us grow by simply clicking on facebook like and google +1 button below ^^

Javorek "Complex" Conditioning pdf




Read
: 2860
Download
: 85
Uploaded
: December 08, 2011
Category
Author
: Randy's HD
Total Page(s)
: 10
Javorek
You're reading the first 10 out of 10 pages of this docs, please download or login to readmore.
Javorek
Istvan “Steve” Javorek Born: Szekelyhid (Sacueni), Romania • professor fitness and all-sports conditioning head coach, Weightlifting Club head coach Johnson County Community College, Overland Park, Kansas, 1987-present • USA College Strength and Conditioning Coaches Hall of Famer • USA Weightlifting Senior international coach • Coach emeritus of Romania • All-sports conditioning coach, track and field throwers and jumpers coach, head weightlifting coach Texas A&M, 1984-87 • Weightlifting and conditioning head coach Clujana Athletic Club-Cluj, Romania, 1964-82 • Coached athletes of junior and senior Romanian weightlifting national teams, 1975-82 • Head coach at the U.S. Olympic Festival for Weightlifting, 1986-87 • 1983 - Coach of South Korean Weightlifting Team by invitation of South Korean Olympic Committee • 1984 - Two weeks lecture tour delegated by the U.S.Olympic Committee, at Lima, Peru • 1989 World Junior Weightlifting Championship USWF team assistant coach Coach Javorek has done so much for me and my career ... I mean, he practically built me from scratch into an All-American. Without his wisdom and training techniques, there is no way I would be the same athlete I am today. He is the best! Wayne Simien – University of Kansas basketball player MacDonald’s All-American Coach Istvan Javorek inspired me as a high school athlete to work hard in the weight room as well as on the basketball court Kareem Rush – LA Lakers shooting guard Javorek’s ideas have had the greatest influence on my philosophy and training of any individual in 30 years of work in this field. Fred Roll – Sports Conditioning Specialist I have used Istvan “Steve” Javorek’s training methods, especially the complex exercises, and have found them to be an asset to our program. Al Vermeil – Strength and Conditioning Coach, Chicago Bulls We have found Istvan Javorek's methods to be practical, functional and advantageous to improving athletic performance. We have implemented his methods with athletes for numerous years and have attained remarkable results. We highly recommend studying his training methods for athletes of all ages. You will undoubtedly improve your performance. Mike Clark and Allen Kinley – Associate Head Coach Strength and Conditioning, Texas A&M Javorek's dumbbell training programs are the best innovation to hit strength training since the barbell. You are only limited by your imagination and the results are fantastic. Rob Rogers – M. Ed., C.S.C.S. Football Conditioning Coach Middle Tennessee State University As a police officer, it is very important to have excellent overall condition. Over the years, I have trained many ways, including the traditional police methods to gain strength and condition. Nothing has produced strength and condition gains like the programs developed by Coach Javorek. Sergeant Geno DeAngelo – Binghamton police department Major Performances Coached: • Dragomir Cioroslan, Romania – U.S.W.F. residence program head coach, 1984 L.A. Olympic Games, bronze medal • Istvan Tasnadi, Romania – 1984 L.A. Olympic Games, silver medal • Randy Barnes at Texas A&M, world-record holder, silver medallist in shot put, 1988 Seoul Olympic Games; gold medal and Olympic champion in shot put, 1996, Atlanta, Georgia, Summer Olympic Games • Ian James, Canada, long jump, at Texas A&M • Juan de la Garza, Mexico, javelin, at Texas A&M • Wesley Barnett, 1992-99 USA National Weightlifting champion; sixth place at 1996 Atlanta, Georgia, Summer Olympic Games; 1996 athlete of the year • Jim Dice, Larry Dice, Dirk Yasko, members of the USWF national squad, national junior and collegiate champions • Coach of 1987,1988, 1989, 1991 National Collegiate Weightlifting Team championship with University of Texas A&M (1987) and Johnson County Community College There is no drug on the planet that can make a 19-foot improvement happen in 8 months … I was transformed. Coach Javorek was the catalyst behind this transformation. Randy Barnes – Shut Put Indoor and Outdoor World-Record Holder, 1988 Olympic Silver, 1996 Olympic Gold Medallist Coach Javorek’s workouts give me the confidence in the ring in the very demanding sport of boxing. His programs keep me strong and in the best cardiovascular condition. Sumya Anani – IBA Lightweight World Champion GBU 143lb. World Champion Coach Javorek’s enormous knowledge of strength and technique helped lay the groundwork for my future success. I was able to take the knowledge I gained from him and use it over the course of my career. Wesley Barnett – 7 times USA national champion, 1996 athlete of the year, 1992,1996 USA Olympic Team, 1997 World Championships Silver medallist
Javorek
Table of Contents Acknowledgments ....................................................................................................................................................................4 Chapter 1 Introduction .........................................................................................................................................................5 Chapter 2 Weightlifter or Weight Trainer?...............................................................................................................................9 Chapter 3 A Brief History of Weightlifting and Sports Conditioning............................................................................................11 Chapter 4 Physical Appearance of the Weightlifter..................................................................................................................14 Chapter 5 Weightlifting as a Conditioning Tool ......................................................................................................................16 Chapter 6 Planning the Training Program..............................................................................................................................18 Chapter 7 Overtraining and Restoration ................................................................................................................................19 Chapter 8 Specificity In Sports Conditioning..........................................................................................................................25 Chapter 9 Drug-free Physical Preparation in Sport...................................................................................................................29 Chapter 10 Warming Up.....................................................................................................................................................31 Chapter 11 Chapter 12 Chapter 13 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Chapter 16 Chapter 17 Chapter 18 Chapter 19 Chapter 20 Chapter 21 Chapter 22 Chapter 23 Chapter 24 Chapter 25 Chapter 26 Chapter 27 Chapter 28 Chapter 29 Chapter 30 Chapter 31 Chapter 32 Chapter 33 Plyometrics in Theory and Practice ........................................................................................................................34 Dumbbells or Machines in General Sports Conditioning?...........................................................................................55 Combined Dumbbell and Barbell Training................................................................................................................63 Dumbbell Programs.............................................................................................................................................71 Dumbbell and Barbell Circuit Conditioning...............................................................................................................73 Javorek’s General Fitness Conditioning # 1 ............................................................................................................88 Javorek’s General Bodybuilding # 1 Training ........................................................................................................101 Javorek’s Dumbbell General Fitness # 2 Training ..................................................................................................113 Javorek’s 12 Week Dumbbell Body Building # 2 Training.......................................................................................123 Javorek’s Barbell Body Building # 1 Training.........................................................................................................133 Javorek’s Mesocycle Conditioning Program # 1 ....................................................................................................145 Javorek’s Mesocycle Conditioning Program # 2.....................................................................................................154 Javorek’s Introduction to “Big Fun” Training.........................................................................................................162 Javorek’s “Big Fun” Program.............................................................................................................................172 Javorek’s Millennium Elite Athletes “Tremendous Pleasure” Conditioning Program......................................................181 Barbell Exercise Classification and Description.......................................................................................................196 Philosophy and Techniques of Weightlifting...........................................................................................................205 Javorek’s 24 Weeks Weightlifting Programs.........................................................................................................212 Javorek’s Four Days a Week Weightlifting Programs..............................................................................................234 General Weight Training for Wheelchair Athletes....................................................................................................242 Exercising at Your Desk .....................................................................................................................................244 Javorek’s Wrist Shoulder Back Ankle and Leg Injuries Athletic Reconditioning Programs..............................................247 Outline For A Weight Training Class.....................................................................................................................254 3
Javorek
Chapter 7 Overtraining and Restoration I n modern athletics and general fitness, the concept of conditioning has changed enormously during the last few decades, but the basic rule of improvement has remained the same, namely the imposition of optimal stimulation, and the avoidance of overloading. Without stimulating the and psychological restoration. I would like to accentuate my idea of recovery and restoration with a very simple example. One two-hour workout per day, 3-4 times a week is not the same as working out 2-3 times a day, six days per week. Assuming 100% recovery in both cases, it would take a month’s worth of once-a-day workouts to equal the load generated in just a week of working out 2-3 times per day. This means that in an Olympic cycle (4 years of 36 hours weekly preparation), the multi-workout per day athlete is doing as much in a single year as the other is doing in all four! You can achieve this goal by proper use of restoration and recovery, while at the same time avoiding overtraining and fatigue. This approach allows one to execute very demanding workloads with- out any physical or psychological ill effects. The recovery and restoration process is the most important factor of any up-to-date athletic conditioning program. It may be designed not only for the healthy athlete’s body but also for the recuperation and rehabilitation of the athlete who may be physically and/or psycholog- ically handicapped as a result of an accident or illness. The recovery exercises should be part of the daily workout routine, and due to their importance, should demand adequate time for their successful imple- mentation. Recovery must be a daily ritual for all athletes and the coach must convince all athletes of its great importance. Daily restora- tion has various phases and possibilities that can be used in concor- dance with the gym or club circumstances. The most important point about recovery is that it is more crucial to prevent overtraining or injury than to treat it. Another point of view is the big difference between daily recovery exercises during the preparatory, transitory or competition periods, and its variations for different age groups. The recovery and restoration time is not the same for a child who is practically untiring, as it is for an older athlete. We have to take into consideration not just the age indicators, but the ath- lete’s working, cultural and social life, as well as the scheduled work- out length and intensity. A coach’s most important daily activity should be writing a precise, detailed plan, i.e., a four-year, yearly, monthly, weekly, and daily plan of preparation which integrates both training and restoration every step along the way. Following a well-organized program with dedica- tion is a sure way to avoid overtraining and obtain full recovery. neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems correctly, the intended improvements and anticipated results will not show up at all or will do so at a lower level. At the same time working out at excessive inten- sity could fatigue the athlete and lead to different degrees of over- training. In modern scientific conditioning we like talking about a year-round preparation, but we make the biggest mistake if we ignore varying long-term organization or periodization of the loading. What I now refer to, as periodization of the yearly plan of preparation is funda- mental to all sport and even many daily activities. It does not matter if I am talking about Weightlifting preparation or conditioning for all sports; the concept of a varying cyclical preparation is necessary and very important. The huge load of today’s workouts and the year-round preparation of course produces its own consequences. Well-planned preparation optimizes adaptation and produces good results, whereas poorly planned or haphazard preparation leads to inadequate perfor- mance or overtraining. What is recovery and why is it so important? I might state that recovery means to quickly regain one hundred per- cent of physical, intellectual and psychological capacity, so that the athlete can begin a new workout or other activity with complete power, full capabilities and skillfulness. The other very similar word used in athletics is restoration, where the Webster Dictionary defines restora- tive as “capable of restoring one’s health or strength”, although in com- petitive sport, one would say that health and strength both need to be restored. Thus, restoration should be an important part of the overall program and intimately associated with functioning of the neuropsy- chological, neuromuscular, metabolic and cardio-respiratory systems of the body. Restoration can be general, but at the same time individu- alized. It has particularities in concordance with each workout, the periodization of preparation and adaptation to the progressively increasing effort. Restoration is a natural process dependent on the neuro-endocrine system, and it has to form an integral part of prepara- tion, regardless of the different phases of training. Less work needs less restoration, which of course results in poor athletic performances. In accordance with the rules of organized conditioning, we have to follow up our athletes’ preparation level and health and personal prob- lems, which can positively or negatively influence their restoration. Furthermore, you cannot use the same methods of restoration during the preparatory, competition and transitory phases, nor even the same methods between workouts. In the preparatory phase, one needs to concentrate more on physical restoration; and in the competition phase more on psychological restoration (though not neglecting phys- ical restoration). The transition phases should offer complete physical Designing a workout schedule There are four important factors for designing a workout schedule: make the schedule enjoyable, avoid monotony, use plenty of exercise variations, and individualize the schedule. All of these factors are very important, but monotony is one of the biggest enemies of good Overtraining and Restoration 19
Javorek
The # 2 program is performed combined with medicine ball and # 3 is the same concept and substitutes # 2 in case of not having medicine ball available. 1. Simultaneous knee hugs x 15 2. Crunches regular or in four sequences (two up + two down) x 20 3. Parallel leg raise, arms under hip x 14 4. Crunches x 20 5. Legs up against the wall half jack knives x 20 6. Crunches regular or in four sequences (2 up + 2 down) x 10 7. Alternate knee bend, twisted sit-ups x 10+10 8. Legs up against the wall or straight up crunches x 10 9. Legs up against the wall half jack-knives x 10 10. Bent knees feet hooked under a heavy DB sit-ups x 20 11. Crunches regular or in four sequences (2 up + 2 down) x 10 12. Alternate knee bend, twisted sit-ups x 10+10 13. Twisted crunches x 10 14. Legs up against the wall half jack-knives x 10 15. Bent knees, feet on the floor, hold up in crunch up position 2 x 20 sec. 16. Legs up against the wall half jack-knives x 20 17. Crunches x 10 18. Bent knees, on your right or left side, arms overhead (left-right) side sit-ups x 10+10 19. Legs up against the wall half jack-knives x 10 20. Bent knees, feet on the floor, hold up in crunch-up position 2 x 30 sec. 21. Twisted crunches x 15 22. Bent knees feet hooked under heavy DB different size DB on chest sit-ups x 20 23. On stomach, arms close to the body, bent at chest level, holding the hips on the floor, gradually straighten the elbows, looking at the ceiling, and hyper extending the back, hold for x 20 sec. Javorek’s GENERAL ABDOMINAL PROGRAM #1 21. Jack-knives x 15 22. Straight legs up, hands on thighs, crunches x 20 23. Lying down, arms bent to head, bent knees & straddled feet, twisted sit-ups x 10+10 24. Bent knees feet hooked under heavy DB or someone stepping on them, different size DB on chest sit-ups x 20 25. Bent knees, feet on the floor, hold up in crunch up position 4 x 15 sec. 26. Lying on stomach, arms close to the body, bent at chest level. Holding the hip on the floor, gradually straighten the elbows, looking up on the ceiling, and hyper extending the back. Hold this position for 15 sec, then raise to hands and knees, curve (round) & arch back for 20 sec. then with straight elbows sit back on heels for x 20 sec. Before starting this program, every individual athlete must be capable of performing with perfect body posture each of these exercises with at least 20 repetitions. Depending on individual goals, or the coach’s prescription, repeat the program as many times is prescribed. On an individual basis, other abdominal exercises could be added to the abdominal program. Do not take a longer break than 10-15 seconds between exercises. Do it slowly but with a dynamic and continuous rhythm. Javorek’s SPECIAL ABDOMINAL PROGRAM # 1 * FOR ADVANCED ATHLETES ONLY* Hooked feet arms cross on chest sit-ups x 10 Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & up + half down & down sit-ups x 10+10 Half jack-knives Or Crunches x 20 Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & down sit-ups x 10+10 Half jack-knives Or Crunches x 20 Hooked feet arms cross on chest half down & up sit-ups x 10+10 Jack-knives x 10 Observation: if the routine becomes very comfortable and “easy-to-perform” add weight(DB on chest) for the hooked feet part of the program. Depending on individual goals or the coach’s prescription, repeat the program as many times as is prescribed. On an individual basis, other abdominal exercises may be added to the abdominal program. Do not take a longer break than 10-15 seconds between exercises. Do it slowly but with a dynamic and continuous rhythm. Do not exercise with improper technique. Javorek’s SPECIAL “MEDICINE BALL” ABDOMINAL PROGRAM # 2 * FOR ADVANCED ATHLETES ONLY* Hooked feet arms cross on chest sit-ups Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & up + half down & down sit-ups Hooked feet medicine ball overhead pass & sit-up Half jack-knives Or Crunches Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & down sit-ups Hooked feet medicine ball chest pass & sit-up Half jack-knives Or Crunches Hooked feet arms cross on chest half down & up sit-ups Hooked feet medicine ball overhead pass & sit-up Hooked feet medicine ball chest pass & sit-up Jack-knives x 10 x 10+10 x 10 x 10 x 10+10 x 10 x 10 x 10+10 x 10 x 10 x 10 Javorek’s GENERAL ABDOMINAL PROGRAM #2 * FOR ADVANCED ATHLETES ONLY* 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Lying down, arms overhead, simultaneous knee hugs x 15 Crunches regular or in four sequences(two up + two down) x 20 Parallel leg raise, arms under hip x 20 Lying down, hands bent to head, alternate knee touch, bicycle x 20+20 Lying down, straight legs up, half jack knives x 20 Seated, hands behind, pointed toes, legs raised to 30 degrees up & down scissors x 30+30 Alternate knee bend, twisted sit-ups x 10+10 Lying with both shoulders on the floor, arms bent to shoulders, hip twisted to left or right side with the top foot crossed over, crunches x 20+20 Jack-knives x 15 Seated, hands behind, pointed toes, legs raised to 30 degrees side to side cross scissors x 30+30 Crunches regular or in four sequences (two up + two down) x 20 Lying down, bent knees, hands bent to head, alternate leg cross-over x 20+20 Lying down, arms bent to head, bent knees, feet hooked under heavy DB or someone stepping on them, half & half sit-ups x 15+15 Jack knives x 10 Lying down, bent knees, feet on the floor, hold up in crunch up position 4 x 15 sec. Lying down, straight legs up, half jack knives x 20 Seated, hands behind, pointed straight legs, simultaneous knee pull to chest, kick out 30 degree, from the floor x 15 Lying on right or left side, bent knees, top hand bent to head, bottom hand cross on side, (left-right) side crunches in four sequences (two up + two down) x 20+20 Jack-knives x 15 Seated, hands behind, pointed straight legs, simultaneous 30 deg leg raise, pull knees to chest, kick out close to the floor x 15 Javorek’s SPECIAL ABDOMINAL PROGRAM # 3 * FOR ADVANCED ATHLETES ONLY* Hooked feet arms cross on chest sit-ups Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & up + half down & down sit-ups Jack-knives or Crunches Half jack-knives or Crunches Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & down sit-ups Jack-knives Half jack-knives or Crunches Hooked feet arms cross on chest half down & up sit-ups Jack-knives Hooked feet arms cross on chest half up & up+ half down & down sit-ups Jack-knives x 10 x 10+10 x 10 x 10 x 10+10 x 10 x 10 x 10+10 x 10 x 10 x 10 Classes of Plyometrics The benefit of plyometrics would be classified as follows: Plyometrics in Theory and Practice 39
Javorek
Exercise # 11 Uphill 10m sprint continued with a double leg take off vertical jump, imitating a sport specific motion(spike, heading, jump shot, etc.) Exercise # 12 Uphill double leg zig-zag jump bounding x 14. Exercise # 13 Uphill alternate leg straight up jump bounding x 14 double steps. Exercise # 14 Uphill one leg straight up jump bounding ( 12 R, 12 L). Exercise # 15 Uphill one leg zig-zag bounding (12R, 12L). Exercise # 16 Uphill same shoulder-same leg sideways jump bounding (10R, 10L). Exercise # 17 Uphill five consecutive same shoulder-same leg sideways jump bounding (5R, 5L), continued with ten m. sprint. Repeat 2-3 times uphill. Exercise # 18 Uphill opposite shoulder-opposite leg sideways jump bounding (10R, 10L). steel angles expansion anchored to the steel reinforced concrete walls that separate this area from the ramp on one side and the stairs on the other. The risers are 16” and the treads vary from 5’ long at the bottom to 3’ long at the top. The treads, which needed to be a soft surface for jumping and landing, were constructed of 8” deep rubber mulch over gravel and perforated drainpipe wrapped in filter fabric to allow storm water to drain from the “jumping boxes”. The drainage system was run to daylight beyond the training area. The boxes get shorter to create an increased inclination from the bottom of the run to the top. This increased inclination makes the exercises progressively more difficult as athletes work their way up the jump boxes. The landing areas need to be soft enough to avoid overstressing to joints during the jumping exercises, but firm enough to hold up under repeated use. So, how I mentioned before, I filled the boxes with eight inches of rubber mulch and recycled tires similar to the material found at many playgrounds. The drains storm water from the boxes to an area well beyond the train- ing area. As a result we are able to use the jump boxes on all but the worst days of our Kansas winters. Maintenance is limited to occasional vacuuming of shredded rubber that spills out of the jump boxes, which we return to the boxes. We added some fence gates to keep out skateboarders who were attracted by the chance to work on their own programs. I use this facility in the specific strength and conditioning programs I design for each team here at JCCC. Uphill training is a key part of our preseason strength and conditioning program, but it’s not the only part. We do traditional weight work every day in addition to daily work on the uphill jump boxes. The athletes have responded well to the uphill work and seem to enjoy it much more than simply running stairs and lifting weights. The uphill conditioning programs are hard work, though. The initial work- outs often leave newcomers overwhelmed. In fact, returning athletes often explain to newcomers that we’re doing this to make them better athletes, not to punish them. But the hard work has paid off. The bas- ketball coaches, for example, say they can’t run the team hard enough to affect their players. After going through our hill training program, the players laugh at the demands of running in the air-conditioned gym. Because the hill training is so demanding, proper preparation is cru- cial. Regardless of the athletes’ conditioning level before the presea- son program begins, I work them into my superset programs gradu- ally. First, I have them perform each exercise separately, focusing on technique instead of workload. It is imperative that athletes fully understand the proper way to complete each exercise before combin - ing them into a program. It is also important to not try to do too much too soon. For example, if I have a big, overweight basketball player, I prescribe more sprint up the slope or stairs until they are in good enough shape to begin leaping and bounding exercises. The prevention of injury must always be an overriding concern. Also as a general safety rule, I never let injured athletes perform any exercises that could aggravate their injuries. And once the athletic trainers clear athletes, I start them on sprints on the ramp and stairs before moving them on to jumps. After everyone has fully mastered all the exercises, I begin to put them together into supersets. I start by having the athletes complete four repetitions of each exercise and work my way up to whatever final total I have determined for their specific teams. For some teams, I incorporate non-hill training activities, such as a mile run, into the hill workout. The general conditioning level of the team and demands of the sport Exercise # 19 Uphill opposite shoulder-opposite leg five consecutive sideways jump bounding (5R, 5L), continued with 10m sprint. Repeat 2-3 times uphill. Exercise # 20 Five standing squat jump continued with 10m uphill sprint. Repeat 2-3 times uphill. Exercise # 21 Exercises # 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 18, 20 may be practiced on stairs or sand stair boxes. Exercise # 22 With advanced athletes the exercises may be increased gradually by holding light DB in both hands next to the thighs. Javorek’s Conditioning Hill Usually tearing down an old building or facility gives room and chances for rebuild a new and better one. This happened in the last two years with the JCCC sand stair boxes conditioning area. The former sand boxes were a homemade series of sand-filled boxes arranged stair-like up a slope on campus, next to a stairway. It worked, but the sand in warm days was dirty and would quickly harden to feel like cement, so it had to be thoroughly broken up and raked each day before use. It also limited the types of drills and exercises I could use. Giving room to a new modern Gym, the sand stair box-conditioning hill was demolished and with a new architectural concept rebuilt. Actually I did fulfill my previous ideas and dreams in building the first specific “conditioning hill” which we named “Javorek’s Conditioning Hill”. Behind my concept is the idea of giving a chance for any given sports to do a specific uphill conditioning. Some sports requires cardio-vascular endurance but quick and explo- sive musculature, others short explosive movements, endurance or you specify what exactly your sport or your athletes need. The Conditioning Hill is a combination of stairs, shredded rubber boxes, (with a superior quality of absorbing the shock easy to maintain and at the same very hygienic) instead of sand boxes (which was more dif- ficult to maintain), and an uphill running ramp, providing for any sports and to the most sophisticated coaching concept a chance to pre- scribe a sport specific conditioning program. The training area stairs and ramp were constructed using concrete with steel reinforcing similar to normal exterior stair and sidewalk con- struction. The stair treads are 15" deep in lieu of 12", with 6" risers, the total rise is 13'-2" with an 8' long landing at the midpoint. The ramp is a continuous 3.5:1 slope, which is the grade on either side of the train- ing area to allow for grass mowing. The third area for jumping was constructed using pressure treated wood risers bolted to galvanized 48 Chapter 11
Javorek
Chapter 12 Dumbbells or Machines in General Sports Conditioning? M y answer and philosophy about the major issue of preferring the use of dumbbells rather than machines in all sports conditioning is as follows: 6 - linear - when both DB are forming a straight line: 6(a) - linear Pronated - with palms down 6(b)- linear Supinated - with palms up 7 - rotational - when we perform from: 7(a) - linear pronated to parallel 7(b) - linear pronated to linear supinated 7(c) - linear supinated to parallel 7(d) - linear supinated to linear pronated, etc. Rotational movement 8 - lateral arm raise with different hand position 9 - frontal arm raise with different hand position 10 - circle, in an alternating or simultaneous way perform a circling movement in different direction 11 - spiral movement, in a circling movement with the hand moving out or in, in a spiraling way 12 - oblique movements - exercises performed in an oblique direction instead of the standard position. DB training 1. is generally safe 2. does not need a large practice area 3. is easy to teach 4. can be done simultaneously and very efficiently with a large num- ber of athletes 5. is dynamic with a large range of motion (actually the range of motion is unlimited) and a large range of exercise variations 6. stimulates (very important in so many sports) the balance mecha- nisms powerfully (which much machine training does not ade- quately do). 7. enables one to develop unlimited muscular power, cardiovascular and muscular endurance, flexibility and strength; (most machine training develops muscles but not dynamic explosive strength) 8. is inexpensive to equip a gym with several sets of DB 9. can be very easily monitored with a 100 percent accuracy, because we have an exact number of repetitions, sets, volumes and rhythm of exercising 10. enables one to efficiently monitor the heart rate before and after each set, thus providing a very clear view of recovery time and the physical fitness level of the individual athlete. Dumbbell Exercise Variations I developed more than 700 dumbbell exercises. I enclosed bellow the 220 most important variations of them. 1 DB standing simultaneous quarter squat & up on toes two hands raise to armpit: Standing with DB in hands at hip level. Bend your knees and simultaneously with knee extension, raise the DB up to your armpit, at the same time coming up onto your toes. Hold your body vertically upright and do not lean your trunk or your head forward. Keep your arms at your sides. Allow the DB to hang freely and do not reverse curl your wrist. 2 DB standing alternate quarter squat & up on toes raise to armpit 3 DB standing one-hand quarter squat & up on toes raise to armpit 4 DB seated simultaneous two hands raise to armpit: tight abdominal muscles. Look straight ahead. Dumbbell Exercise Classification and Description A better system of dumbbell exercise classification has been needed for many years, so I have attempted to do in the following sections. DB exercise variations are unlimited and any experienced coach with a good knowledge of kinesiology should be able to figure out many novel variations of DB exercises. In order to be able to classify them, we need to follow certain rules and criteria, such as: 5 DB seated alternate raise to armpit 6 DB seated one-hand raise to armpit 7 DB standing simultaneous two hands raise to armpit and split jump Standing in a lunge, DB in hand next to the thighs, trunk in perfect vertical line. It is very important the perfect split jump technique. Do not jump up, just split the legs; keep the trunk in a vertical position; tighten the abdominal muscles; the front leg lands always first on heels and then rolls over on flat foot. There are three variations of it: (a) regular split jump without any arm movement (b) split jumps with simultaneous arms raises to the arm pit: on each leg split (changing leg position by splitting back and forth, but not jumping up), raise the arms up to the armpit (same technique as regular DB Raise to Armpit) and during the split let the arms down. Every leg split movement is connected with a DB raise to the armpit and repositioning of the arms, straight down to the initial position. Learning the exercise is best if the movement is sequenced, practicing each stage separately. After good arm-leg coordination is achieved, the different parts of the exercise can be connected and executed in a nonstop manner (c) the split jump variations can be executed with short lunges or wide lunges, depending the goals. For example: sprinters, long and triple jumpers should practice both forms; long distance runners need to focus more on the short split jump with DB raises to the armpit. The Basic Body and Dumbbell Positions A. Body position: standing; seated, bent-over; lying on your back on a bench(flat, incline, decline); B. Dumbbell position: 1- simultaneous - performing with both hands at the same time 2 - alternating - performing with each hand individually in an alternating way 3 - one-hand - when we perform an exercise just with one hand 4- two hands - when we perform an exercise with both hands 5 - parallel - when both DB are in a parallel set Dumbbells or Machines in Genral Sports Conditioning 55
Javorek
Chapter 23 Javorek’s Introduction to “Big Fun” Training F For every serious athlete, I consider it very beneficial to sometimes change their routines - to body for an even more challenging plan. Many people have heard about Javorek’s famous “Big Parallel Bar Dips With Weights 10% 12 10% 12 15% 12 or 5 Sets x 12 without weight 15% 12 15% 12 shock their muscles, to battle fatigue with their current exercise program or to prepare their Fun” program. Sometimes from a magazine article and sometimes from another athlete who’s life was changed by this amazing 12-week program. But is too often in America that people skip necessary steps or jump to something they see someone else doing assuming they will get the same results. I must stress that my “Big Fun” program is too difficult for most serious athletes to just begin doing. You must pre- pare your body for the stress that “Big Fun” will place on your sys- tem. “Big Fun” will also offer tremendous benefit to your training and body and performance, but could result in frustration or possibly injury if you do not prepare correctly. In the next chapter I will describe “Big Fun” in detail, but the exercise programs listed here are described as an “Introduction to Big Fun” for a reason: if you cannot complete these 12 weeks programs, then you certainly should not be attempting “Big Fun.” If you are just beginning with a weightlifting conditioning program, here is a possible order for you to follow: Javorek’s 12 weeks Dumbbell General Fitness #1 (Chapter 16) Javorek’s 12 weeks Dumbbell Body Building Conditioning #1 (Chapter 17 Javorek’s 12 weeks Dumbbell General Fitness #2 (Chapter 18) Javorek’s 12 weeks Dumbbell Body Building Conditioning #2 (Chapter 19 Javorek’s 12 weeks Barbell Body Building Conditioning #1 (Chapter 20 Javorek’s 6 weeks Mesocycle Conditioning #1 and #2 (Chapter 21 & 22) Javorek’s 12 weeks Introduction to Big Fun (this chapter) Just after these preparatory programs try the demanding Javorek’s Big Fun Conditioning Program or Javorek’s Elite Athletes Tremendous Pleasure program. If someone competes in a sport like weightlifting, throwing events, wrestling and boxing, where the yearly preparation requires very specific conditioning, it would be sufficient to practice just a 12 week conditioning program before attempting “Big Fun.” Obs: Set break time between the sets individually Barbell Back Squat 40% 12 25% 6 40% 12 25% 6 50% 10 30% 6 45% 12 30% 6 55% 10 35% 6 60% 10 35% 6 70% 5 Barbell Back Squat Jump General Plyometrics Exercises On Stairs or Shredded Rubber Boxes or Sand Stair Boxes No Break 4 x Stair Double Leg 4 x Run & Jump & Sprint 4x Stair Double Leg Zig-Zag 4 x Stair Sprint Javorek’s General Abdominal Program No Break 1 Set Week 1 40% 15 40% 12 50% 12 40% 16+16 50% 10 10% 8 40% 12 45% 14 40% 12 50% 12 Day 2 50% 12 45% 10 60% 10 50% 12 45% 10 60% 10 60% 10 50% 10 65% 10 45% 16+16 65% 10 10% 6 60% 10 45% 20+20 10% 6 50% 10 45% 20+20 70% 5 50% 20+20 55% 12 55% 10 70% 10 50% 16+16 55% 16+16 65% 10 60% 10 Dumbbell (Regular) Supinated Curls Dumbbell From Hip High Pull Snatch Dumbbell Parallel Press Dumbbell Alternate Leg Lunges 45% 16+16 50% 10 10% 8 45% 12 50% 16+16 60% 10 10% 8 40% 12 Barbell Behind the Head From Half Squat Wide Grip Press 55% 10 10% 8 50% 10 High Bar Pronated Grip Behind The Head Pull Ups Barbell Back Squat Dumbbell Lunge Walk 40% 20+20 40% 20+20 45% 20+20 Week 1 50% 14 70% 10 50% 14 40% 10 45% 1 50% 10 50% 14 Day 1 55% 14 60% 12 50% 14 55% 14 60% 12 70% 10 Barbell Regular (Supinated) Curls General Plyometrics Exercises On Stairs, Sand Stair or Shredded Rubber Boxes No Break 4 x Stair Double Leg 4 x Run & Jump & Sprint 4x Stair Double Leg Zig-Zag 4 x Stair Sprint Dumbbell Upright Row 55% 14 45% 10 50% 1 60% 10 60% 12 45% 10 55% 1 65% 10 65% 10 50% 10 55% 1 65% 10 70% 10 50% 10 45% 1 70% 10 70% 10 55% 10 55% 1 70% 10 55% 10 60% 10 Dumbbell High Pull Snatch Javorek’s Barbell Complex # 1 Dumbbell Parallel Push Press Javorek’s General Abdominal Program 1 Set 162 Chapter 23
Javorek
Competition Week # 10 Monday Barbell From Floor & Hang & Floor Combined Squat Snatch 70% 3 70% 2+2 80% 1+2 70% 2 70% 3 70% 3 70% 2 80% 1+2 85% 1+1 75% 2 75% 3 80% 4 80% 2 80% 2 75% 2 75% 3 75% 2 75% 2+2 85% 1+1 80% 2 75% 3 85% 1 80% 2 85% 1 80% 2 80% 2 80% 2 80% 2 80% 1+2 80% 2 75% 2+2 80% 2 80% 1+2 Barbell Medium (Clean) Grip High Pull Snatch 75% 2 80% 1 80% 1 Friday Barbell From The Platform Squat Snatch 70% 2 90% 1 70% 1+2 85% 1+2 70% 3 70% 3 70% 2 90% 1 70% 1+2 85% 1+2 80% 2 75% 3 80% 2 80% 4 75% 2 85% 2 80% 2 90% 1 75% 1+2 90% 1+1 75% 2 75% 2 85% 2 95% 1 80% 1+2 80% 2 85% 2 85% 2 Barbell From The Platform Squat Clean & Jerk Barbell From The Platform Squat Clean and Jerk 85% 1+2 80% 1+2 Barbell From The Platform Power Clean Barbell Medium or Wide Grip Bench Press Barbell Back Squat Barbell Medium or Wide Grip Bench Press 85% 1 80% 3 85% 2 85% 3 85% 1 80% 2 85% 2 Barbell Back Squat Tuesday Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch 70% 2 80% 3 70% 2 75% 2 90% 3 75% 2 80% 2 95% 3 75% 2 70% 2 90% 3 75% 2 75% 2 95% 3 80% 2 80% 1 100% 2 80% 2 80% 2 105% 2 80% 2 75% 2 95% 3 75% 2 80% 2 100% 3 80% 1 75% 2 Saturday Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch 70% 2 85% 3 70% 2+2 75% 2 95% 2 75% 2+2 80% 2 100% 2 85% 1 70% 2 90% 2 75% 1+2 80% 2 100% 1 80% 1+2 85% 1 105% 2 85% 1 85% 1 90% 1 90% 1 80% 2 95% 2 80% 1+2 85% 1 105% 1 80% 1+2 90% 1 85% 1 Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Barbell From Floor & Hang or Hang & Floor Combined Power Clean Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Barbell From Floor & Hang or Hang & Floor Combined Power Clean Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Barbell From Floor & Hang or Hang & Floor Combined Power Clean Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Barbell From The Platform Power Clean & Push Press Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Barbell From The Platform Power Clean & Push Press Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch Wednesday Power and Squat Snatch combined from Hang 70% 2 70% 2+2 70% 3 70% 3 70% 2 75% 1+2 75% 3 70% 3 75% 2 75% 2+2 80% 2 75% 2 75% 2 80% 1+2 80% 1 75% 3 75% 3 80% 1+2 80% 2 80% 2 80% 2 80% 2+2 80% 1 80% 1 80% 2 80% 1 75% 2 80% 2 Competition Week # 11 Monday Barbell From Hang Squat Snatch 70% 2 90% 1 70% 2+2 90% 1+2 70% 3 90% 1 70% 3 90% 1 75% 2+2 90% 1+1 70% 2 90% 1 75% 3 80% 2 75% 2 80% 2 80% 2 85% 2 80% 1+1 90% 1+1 80% 3 85% 1 85% 2 85% 1+2 85% 2 90% 1 90% 1+2 90% 1 95% 1 90% 1 Barbell From The Platform Power Clean &Push Press Barbell From Lunge Behind The Head Press Barbell Front Squat Barbell From The Platform Squat Clean & Jerk 80% 1+2 Barbell Medium or Wide Grip Bench Press 85% 2 85% 2 90% 1 90% 1 Thursday Barbell Wide (Snatch) Grip High Pull Snatch 70% 3 70% 2 80% 3 70% 2 95% 2 75% 2 100% 2 70% 3 70% 2 85% 3 70% 2 100% 2 75% 2 105% 2 105% 2 100% 2 75% 3 75% 2 90% 2 75% 3 75% 2 75% 4 75% 2 80% 2 80% 2 Barbell Back Squat 70% 4 80% 3 85% 2 80% 2 85% 2 80% 2 85% 2 Barbell On Chest From Squat Rack Jerk Barbell From The Platform Clean Pull Barbell Medium (Clean) Grip High Pull Snatch Barbell From The Platform Clean Pull Barbell Medium (Clean) Grip High Pull Snatch Barbell From The Platform Clean Pull Tuesday Barbell From The Platform Power Snatch 70% 2 70% 2 80% 3 75% 2 80% 2 90% 2 80% 2 80% 2 95% 2 85% 1 85% 2 100% 2 90% 1 90% 1 105% 2 90% 1 85% 2 100% 2 90% 1 90% 1 90% 1 Barbell From The Platform Power Clean Barbell From The Platform Snatch Pull Javorek’s 24 Weeks Weightlifting Programs 231
Javorek
Javorek’s General Abdominal Program * For advanced performance athletes only Before starting this program, every individual athlete must be capable of per- forming with perfect body posture each of these exercises with at least 20 rep- etitions. Depending on individual goals, or the coach’s prescription, repeat the program as many times as prescribed. On individual basis, other abdominal exercises could be added to the abdominal program. Do not take longer break than 10-15 seconds between exercises. Do it slowly but with a dynamic and continuous rhythm. 8. Lying with both shoulders on the floor, arms bent to shoulders, hip twisted to left or right side with the top foot crossed over, crunches..............................x 20+20 1. Lying Down, arms overhead, simultaneous knee hugs ...x 15 9. Jack knifes....................................................................x 15 2. Crunches regular or in four sequences (two up & two down)....................................................x 20 10. Seated, hands behind, pointed toes, legs raised to 30˚ side to side cross scissors......................................x 30+30 3. Parallel leg raise, arms under hip..................................x 20 11. Crunches regular or in four sequences (two up and two down).................................................x 20 4. Lying down, hands bent to head, alternate knee touch, bicycle...................................x 20+20 12. Lying down, bent knees, hands bent to head, alternate leg cross-overs.........................................x 20+20 5. Lying down, straight legs up, half jack knifes...............x 20 13. Lying down, arms bent to head, bent knees hooked under heavy dumbbells, or someone stepping on them, half and half situps..................................................x 15+15 6. Seated, hands behind, pointed toes, legs raised to 30˚ up and down scissors.............................................x 30+30 14. Jack knifes....................................................................x 10 7. Alternate knee bend, twisted sit ups.......................x 10+10 Javorek’s Wrist Shoulder Back Ankle and Leg Injuries 249
You're reading the first 10 out of 10 pages of this docs, please download or login to readmore.

People are reading about...