South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1

South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1 free pdf ebook was written by The Department For Transport, Energy And Infrastructure on July 15, 2011 consist of 17 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.sa.gov.au and available on pdfpedia since April 14, 2012.

safety equipment 4. safety equipment checklists– what you need and where 42 categories..service sa customer service centre (refer chapter 13). vessels and activities, it’s..the banks of lakes alexandrina and albert. • unprotected waters—waters offshore of a...

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South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1 pdf




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South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 1
Safety equipment
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South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 2
4. Safety equipment Checklists– what you need and where 42 Categories of South Australian waters 42 44 44 44 44 45 45 45 45 45 47 48 Required safety equipment Vessels less than 8 metres long Protected waters Semi-protected waters Unprotected waters Vessels 8–15 metres long Protected waters Semi-protected waters Unprotected waters Vessels more than 15 metres long (all SA waters) Variations from standard requirements Recommended equipment 44 Safety equipment Standards and features Anchors Charts and maps Distress flares (EPIRB) Standards Fire extinguishers Portable Fire Extinguisher Guide Marine radio Miscellaneous safety Equipment standards Personal flotation devices (PFDs) Tide times 48 48 49 49 50 51 51 52 52 53 54 56 Emergency position indicating radio beacon Chapter 4. Self-check questions 56
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 3
42 | South Australian recreational boating safety handbook Safety equipment All vessels operating in South Australian Checklists– what you waters are legally required to carry need and where certain safety equipment, depending on As a ready reminder of the safety the vessel’s size and type, and where it equipment you need on board, DTEI is being used, for example, in the open has safety equipment stickers available sea or in a river. For certain types of through any Service SA customer service centre (refer chapter 13). vessels and activities, it ’s also required that you wear a PFD at all times. Safety Categories of South Australian waters equipment must be in good working Schedule 9 of the Harbors and Navigation order, readily accessible, and protected Regulations 2009 (refer chapter 13) lists the minimum safety equipment that you’re required from the sea and weather. In this chapter are safety equipment checklists for all recreational vessel types and uses, and the required standards or features of the equipment. to carry in South Australian waters; these waters are defined as being either protected, semi-protected or unprotected. Protected waters—all inland waters excluding Lake Albert and Lake Alexandrina. Semi-protected waters—waters inshore of a line 2 nautical miles seaward of the low water mark of the coast of the mainland or Kangaroo Island, or the banks of Lakes Alexandrina and Albert. Unprotected waters—waters offshore of a line 2 nautical miles seaward of the low water mark of the coast of the mainland and Kangaroo Island, or the banks of Lakes Alexandrina and Albert. Reminder: ‘inland waters’ are defined in Harbors and Navigation Regulations 2009 as not being influenced by tide; therefore, the Port Adelaide River and the Coorong are classified as semi-protected waters. The legislation also refers to the waters of Spencer Gulf and Gulf of St Vincent, which are defined as follows. Spencer Gulf—the waters north of a line drawn from Cape Catastrophe on Eyre Peninsula to Waterhouse Point on Thistle Island and then to Corny Point on Yorke Peninsula. Gulf of St Vincent—the waters north of a line drawn from Troubridge Point on Yorke Peninsula to Rapid Head on Fleurieu Peninsula.
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 4
Chapter 4. Safety equipment | 43 Safety equipment Map of the gulf waters
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 5
44 | South Australian recreational boating safety handbook Required safety equipment Vessels less than 8 metres long Protected waters One approved PFD Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 for each person on board. Bucket/s with line attached, or bilge pump/s sufficient to drain each compartment of the vessel. Fire bucket.* If the vessel has an engine or cooking facilities, one fire extinguisher. Suitable anchor with cable. If the vessel is being operated at night, a waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. If the vessel is less than 6 m long, a pair of paddles or oars. Semi-protected waters One approved PFD Type 1 for each person on board. Bucket/s with line attached, or bilge pump/s sufficient to drain each compartment of the vessel. Fire bucket.* If the vessel has an engine or cooking facilities, one fire extinguisher. Suitable anchor with cable. Waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. Two hand-held red flares and two hand-held orange smoke signals. If the vessel is less than 6 m long, a pair of paddles or oars, or other means of auxiliary propulsion. If the vessel has an engine or cooking facilities, one fire extinguisher. Suitable anchor with cable. Waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. Two hand-held red flares and two hand-held orange smoke signals. Two-way marine radio, capable of communicating with onshore stations. Four litres of fresh water. Fitted, liquid damped magnetic or gyroscopically controlled compass (a hand-held compass is not suitable—a GPS, satellite navigation system or similar electronic device cannot be relied on solely). If the vessel is less than 6 m long, a pair of paddles or oars, or other means of auxiliary propulsion. If the vessel will operate more than five nautical miles from shore in Gulf of St Vincent or Spencer Gulf, or more than three nautical miles from shore, except in inland waters, Lakes Alexandrina and Albert; all of the above, plus: – 406 MHz EPIRB – V distress sheet. If the vessel will operate more than 10 nautical miles from shore, all of the above, plus: – two distress rockets with parachutes – a map or chart of the waters in which the boat will operate. Safety equipment Unprotected waters One approved PFD Type 1 for each person on board. Bucket/s with line attached, or bilge pump/s sufficient to drain each compartment of the vessel. Fire bucket.* Bailer/fire bucket
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 6
Chapter 4. Safety equipment | 45 Vessels 8–15 metres long Protected waters One approved PFD Type 1, Type 2 or Type 3 for each person on board. One bailer with line attached. Bilge pump/s sufficient to drain each compartment of the vessel. Fire bucket.* If the vessel has an engine or cooking facilities, two fire extinguishers. Suitable anchor with cable. If the vessel is being operated at night, a waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. Lifebuoy with line. One approved PFD Type 1 for each person on board. Two bailers with lines attached. Bilge pump/s sufficient to drain each compartment of the vessel. Fire bucket.* If the vessel has an engine or cooking facilities, two fire extinguishers. Two suitable anchors with cables (if vessel is less than 12 m one may be carried as a spare). Waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. Two hand-held red flares and two hand-held orange smoke signals. Lifebuoy with line. One approved PFD Type 1 for each person on board. Two bailers with lines attached. Bilge pump/s sufficient to drain each compartment of the vessel. Fire bucket.* If the vessel has an engine or cooking facilities, two fire extinguishers. Two suitable anchors with cables. Waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. Semi-protected waters Two hand-held red flares and two hand-held orange smoke signals. Two-way marine radio, capable of communicating with onshore stations. Four litres of fresh water. Fitted, liquid damped magnetic or gyroscopically controlled compass (a hand-held compass is not suitable—a GPS, satellite navigation system or similar electronic device cannot be relied on solely). Lifebuoy with line. If the vessel will operate more than five nautical miles from shore in Gulf of St Vincent or Spencer Gulf, or more than three nautical miles from shore, except in inland waters, Lakes Alexandrina and Albert; all of the above, plus: – 406 MHz EPIRB – V distress sheet. If the vessel will operate more than 10 nautical miles from shore, all of the above, plus: – two distress rockets with parachutes – a map or chart of the waters in which the boat will operate. * The bailer can double as the fire bucket if it: is attached to a lanyard is suitable for collecting water over the side of the vessel won’t distort or break when filled. A fire bucket does not need to be metal to meet the above standards. Safety equipment Unprotected waters Vessels more than 15 metres long (all SA waters) All of the safety equipment required for a vessel 8-15 m long operating in unprotected waters, plus: an additional lifebuoy with line attached a life raft.
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 7
46 | South Australian recreational boating safety handbook Required safety equipment Vessels less than 8 metres long Approved PFD per person Bucket with line attached and bilge pump(s) Fire bucket One approved fire extinguisher ( if engine fitted or cooking facilities on board) Anchor and cable Protected Waters Semi-protected Waters Unprotected Waters Safety equipment Waterproof and buoyant torch Approved compass fitted to the vessel Four litres fresh water Two approved flares and smoke signals Marine radio Paddles/oars ( if your vessel is under six metres) if operating at night Type 1 * Type 1 two bailers Type 1 * Vessels 8 metres long and over Approved PFD per person Bucket with line attached and bilge pump(s) Fire bucket Two approved fire extinguishers ( if engine fitted or cooking facilities on board) Anchor and cable Waterproof and buoyant torch Approved compass fitted to the vessel Four litres fresh water Two approved flares and smoke signals Marine radio Lifebuoy with line two # if operating at night Type 1 two bailers two Additional equipment for all vessels regardless of length in prescribed unprotected waters i.e.: more than three nautical miles from shore , except in inland waters, in Lakes Alexandrina and Albert; or more than five nautical miles from shore in Gulf of St Vincent or Spencer Gulf EPIRB (Radio Distress Beacon) V sheet • more than ten nautical miles from shore. Two approved rocket parachute flares Chart of the area of water If your vessel is over 15 metres in length you are required to carry an extra lifebuoy with line and a life raft. * or another type of propulsion # If vessel is under 12 metres, second anchor can be carried as a spare
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 8
Chapter 4. Safety equipment | 47 Variations from standard requirements Certain types of boat are either partially or totally exempt from the safety equipment requirements adjacent. Those vessels exempted from the above must instead carry the following. Canoes, kayaks, rowboats, or similar small, unpowered vessels—in protected or semi- protected waters must carry: – one PFD Type 1, 2 or 3 for each person on board (must be worn at all times, except when in a rowboat) – one suitable bailer, unless the hull is permanently enclosed – if the vessel is being operated at night, a waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern. Canoes, kayaks, rowboats, or similar small, unpowered vessels—in unprotected waters require:* – one approved PFD Type 1 or 2 with whistle attached, worn at all times – one suitable bailer, unless the hull is permanently enclosed – if the vessel is being operated at night, a waterproof and buoyant torch or lantern – one spare paddle – V distress sheet – one tow line at least 15 m in length and strong enough for the vessel to be towed in any conditions – two hand-held red flares and two hand- held orange smoke signals – one fitted, liquid damped or magnetic compass – one map or chart of the area of operation – one litre of fresh water – one EPIRB. Personal watercraft (PWC) # —an approved PFD Type 2 or Type 3, worn at all times. Sailboards or kite boards require: – within 400 m of shore—a PFD Type 1, 2 or 3, worn at all times – more than 400 m from shore—a PFD Type 1, worn at all times. Surfboards or surf skis—in inland waters, an appropriate approved PFD, worn at all times. Surf rescue boats propelled by motor, when involved in rescue work within 1500 m of the shoreline or patrol work within 1000 m—pair of paddles or oars, or other means of auxiliary propulsion. Surf rescue boats propelled by paddles or oars—a bailer attached to the vessel by a lanyard. Tender vessels, while being used in conjunction with another vessel must carry: – one pair of paddles or oars, or other means of auxiliary propulsion – one bucket, bailer or bilge pump/s to drain each compartment – if the vessel is 1500 m or more from the shoreline, an approved PFD Type 1 for each person. Safety equipment Waterskiers or people being towed by a vessel in any other way—an approved PFD Type 2 or Type 3 worn at all times. * A canoe, kayak, rowboat or similar small, unpowered vessel operating in unprotected waters is exempted from carrying flares, smoke signals, compass, EPIRB or chart of the area, if the vessel is: – with at least two other similar vessels, or a support vessel; and – at least one of the accompanying vessels is equipped with all listed equipment; and – the exempted vessel remains within 50 m of the fully-equipped vessel at all times. # A PWC may not be operated in unprotected waters (refer Introduction, Common marine terms).
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 9
48 | South Australian recreational boating safety handbook Recommended equipment While no longer a legal requirement for boats longer than 6 m, auxiliary power such as paddles, oars or a spare motor is strongly advised. It is also recommended that every vessel is equipped or fitted with: a sounding device (horn or whistle) a towing harness and rope an isolating switch emergency steering GPS (valuable to assist navigation, but do not rely on as the sole navigation tool. The units are electrical and batteries can go flat, while maps can be incomplete). Standards and features This section outlines the minimum standards and features your safety equipment requires to perform as you expect when needed. – though these anchors are fine in South Australia they may not be approved in all states; you should check with local authorities before going boating interstate. Sea anchor or drogue – this may be anything that can be used for offshore boating to slow drift, eg. a large bucket trailing behind the vessel – keeps bow facing into wind and waves – a sea anchor or drogue will not hold your vessel fast, so if using a sea anchor you must also carry an approved type. SARCA (sand and rock combination anchor) – superb holding power – multi-purpose—suited to mud, sand, gravel and rock bottoms – not suited to snags (for example, the River Murray). Safety equipment Anchors An anchor is a very important item of equipment and should be selected carefully. Choose an anchor that will suit your circumstances and the area of operation. The most common types are: Danforth – recommended for small craft – small, light, easy to handle – excellent holding power, especially in sand, but may get caught on reefs. Coral quick release (CQR) or plough – suited to larger and heavier vessels – excellent holding power, but best suited to mud; may get caught on reefs. Grapnel – flexible prongs (suitable for anchoring on reefs) – suited to snag and rock conditions (for example, the River Murray) Consider the following points in selecting the line. Don’t use a line that floats, such as polypropylene (it doesn’t help the anchor to dig in and is prone to being cut by other propellers). Nylon and silver ropes have strength, stretching ability and resistance to abrasion, and don’t easily float in water. Nylon is stronger than silver rope. The line must be resistant to chafing at the deck lead. For best performance, insert a length of chain between the anchor and line: – at least 2 m long, for nylon lines; or – at least 3 m long, for other lines. All-chain lines are recommended for larger vessels, to increase holding power and absorb shock.
South Australian recreational boating safety handbook - version 1  - page 10
Chapter 4. Safety equipment | 49 Scope 3:1 Anchor Chain at least 2-3 metres (see text) WIND Bow Roller Bitter End Anchor Safety equipment Sandy Seabed The length of the anchor line is dependent on the depth of the water and the prevail ing conditions. Charts and maps Vessels more than 10 nautical miles from shore must carry a navigation chart or map of the waters they are navigating. Charts and maps should: be suitable for navigation purposes be up-to-date help the operator plot a course or destination identify navigation features including the location of shipwrecks and other submerged hazards, depth of water, and the location of islands and hidden reefs show details such as navigation beacons and markers to harbours and channel entrances. Note: GPS plotters are not a substitute for a marine chart. Ensure everyone on board knows where the flares are kept and how to use them. In handling flares, it is important to: familiarise yourself with their operation, including how to set off the correct flare in darkness (refer chapter 9, Emergency action) store them so they are accessible in an emergency keep them dry, as they attract moisture and don’t work as well when damp stow them away from fuel and combustibles protect them from pounding in rough conditions, such as in speedboats monitor expiry dates (flares generally have a life of three years from date of manufacture) dispose of spent or expired flares at a police station or your local volunteer marine rescue group. It’s an offence to misuse flares, or to activate a flare for ‘practice’. Some volunteer marine rescue groups hold authorised demonstrations and these are recommended if you’re unsure how to use your flares. Distress flares Flares are best used in emergencies to attract attention from passing vessels or aircraft, or to pinpoint your position to rescuers. They can’t be re-used though, so use your marine radio or other distress signals first. If you have to use a flare, you should try where possible to keep at least one flare in reserve to use when you can see an aircraft, or people on shore or in other boats.
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