Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media?

Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? free pdf ebook was written by Tony Ramos on June 24, 2009 consist of 39 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.welcometosocialmedia.com and available on pdfpedia since May 19, 2011.

educational materials designed to help individuals and businesses http://www.welcometosocialmedia.com/ for access to this volume. and future volumes. editor ...

x
send send what is readshare?


Thank you for helping us grow by simply clicking on facebook like and google +1 button below ^^

Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? pdf




Read
: 1230
Download
: 23
Uploaded
: May 19, 2011
Category
Author
: Tony Ramos
Total Page(s)
: 39
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 1
You're reading the first 10 out of 39 pages of this docs, please download or login to readmore.
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 2
Welcome to Social Media was created as a place for the Cleveland Social Media Club to share educational materials designed to help individuals and businesses navigate the quickly evolving world of social media. This is the first of what we hope will be many e-books offering social media tips and advice to users of all skill levels. Please visit http://www.welcometosocialmedia.com/ for access to this volume and future volumes. Editor-in-Chief: Copy editors: Project leader: Print/PDF design & layout: Web site design and development: Jim England Heidi Cool, Jim England, Jeff Hershberger, George Nemeth, Stephanie Jansky, Tony Ramos George Nemeth Tony Ramos Heidi Cool Welcome to Social Media by Cleveland Social Media Club is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://clevelandsmc.ning.com. Read the full license here. You are free to share—to copy, distribute and transmit the work—under the following conditions: Attribution — You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the authors (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). Noncommercial — You may not use this work for commercial purposes. No Derivative Works — You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work. …with the understanding that any of the above conditions can be waived if you get permission from the copyright holder. Thank you. ii Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 3
I NTRODUCTION —D EFINING S OCIAL M EDIA AND ITS R ELEVANCE What is Social Media? ....................................................................................................................... 1 How Social Media Changed My Life .................................................................................................. 1 T HE B REAKDOWN —A NALYZING AND E VALUATING S OCIAL M EDIA T ECHNOLOGY Using Social Media to Better Meet Your Needs ................................................................................. 2 Conversation: The Catalyst for Connection ....................................................................................... 4 Micro-Media & The Future of Narrative ............................................................................................ 6 D ISCUSSIONS —F EATURED R ECOMMENDATIONS , O BSERVATIONS , AND I NSPIRATION Social Media for the Working Mom or Dad ....................................................................................... 8 Social Media Makes Pepper Pike a Hub of Activism .......................................................................... 9 What Does Your Profile Photo Say About You? ............................................................................... 10 P ERSONAL B EST P RACTICES —U TILIZING S OCIAL M EDIA FOR P ERSONAL G ROWTH Using Social Media to Help Your Job Search .................................................................................... 11 Using Social Media to Make Face-to-Face Connections ................................................................... 13 Writing Well for Social Media ......................................................................................................... 14 P ROFESSIONAL B EST P RACTICES —S OCIAL M EDIA IN THE W ORKPLACE Setting Goals to Plan Your Social Media Strategy ............................................................................ 18 Introduction to Measuring Social Media for PR/Marketing ............................................................. 21 Social Media and Social Change: A Guide for Nonprofit Organizations ............................................ 23 Promoting Events Via Social Media ................................................................................................. 25 T ECHNOLOGY AND A PPLICATIONS —T HE P OWER AND P OSSIBILITIES OF S OCIAL M EDIA Social Media and Presentation Technology ..................................................................................... 27 Privacy and Security in Social Media ............................................................................................... 30 Social Media Case Study: messy magazine ...................................................................................... 32 Things to Consider When Building a Social Media Web Application ................................................ 34 Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland iii
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 4
S o there is this online phenomenon that is attracting troves of people to participate in these online websites. They all claim to be a part of a revolution called “social media,” but what is social media anyway? It is easiest to begin with something we understand—media. Media is a means for communication. It involves a content medium— like pictures, sounds, videos, or text—and it conveys meaning and information to an audience. Sometimes that audience is you, sometimes it’s your friend, or sometimes it’s your crazy uncle who moved to Timbuktu. Take TV for example—someone decided to make a TV show, chose you as the audience, and sent information to you through a box in your living room. This is an example of traditional media as we have become accustomed to. Old media, like TV, radio, newspapers, and even most websites are unidirectional. They talk at you, not with you. However, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter represent something different—everyone can make pictures, sounds, videos, or text. Everyone can convey meaning and information to an audience. Everyone is an equal player with equal ability to share his or her perspective. But most importantly—when you say something, people can talk back. They respond and discuss, and you respond and discuss. Instead of talking at your friends and colleagues, you actually are talking with them. This discussion, powered by the Internet, allows people to form online communities around their interests. These communities have been freed from geographical and other limitations, allowing people to work together in ways never before possible. This revolution has transformed the Internet into a medium of communities and conversations—social media. Tim Gasper, CMO and cofounder of CorkShare, is a senior at Case Western Reserve University, Economics and Marketing major with a web/tech focus. His interests include social media, blogging, music writing, and running. My life changed in January 2008. That's when I attended a forum at the University of Akron featuring David Tapscott, the author of Wikinomics. In the course of an hour, I learned about social media and found a new career. In some ways, I think I have always been a social media person. My parents always had newspapers around the house, while TV was my best friend. In college, I studied public relations, but I was heavily involved with radio and the newspaper. While working at Cleveland.com in 2000, I was in awe of the techies because they had the 1 Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 5
know-how to actually do the things that I pondered in my head. By 2008, social network tools like Blogger allowed me to turn my ideas into a reality. After seeing Mr. Tapscott's speech, I immersed myself in social media and read books like David Meerman Scotts' “New Rules For Marketing and PR”. In February 2008, I attended a seminar where I met Michelle Veronsky, author of the blog Foodie Critic, (who was a great help to me) and Matt Dickman, who introduced me to Twitter. I took this information and used their advice for a social media campaign for Lock 3 Park, the downtown entertainment venue for the City of Akron. From April to September, I was a social media maven—with the focus of Steve Jobs and the swagger of Jay-Z. I created a blog called lock3live.blogspot.com, where I previewed performances, posted pictures on Flickr, created viral contests and uploaded behind the scenes interviews via YouTube. I used Twitter to remind Tweeps about shows and MySpace to interact with performers. However, social media became real to me when a woman walked up to me and said “Thank You”. The woman recognized me from the Lock 3 Park tour video I had uploaded to YouTube Originally from Akron, the woman had moved to Dayton years before Lock 3 Park was built. She decided to come after watching the tour link her sister had sent from YouTube. This is the power of social media. While measuring tools, like Google Analytics, are a great way to measure online traffic, you don't always know if your social media efforts are really making an impact. But when you see the results in person, as I did when meeting the woman who had traveled from Dayton, the results are made real. While winning the Emerging Leader Award from The Summit Awards for my Lock 3 Park campaign was great, there's nothing more satisfying than hearing someone say “Thank You” for your work. That's the true meaning of SOCIAL Media. Kevin Lockett is a social media consultant in Akron, Ohio. In late 2008 he successfully used Facebook in a social media awareness campaign to help bring back canceled stations on Sirius XM radio. Recently, Mr. Lockett launched Hirejam.com, a Web site dedicated to green jobs in the State of Ohio. Kevin can be found on a variety of services including LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and email. Why are people wasting time on Facebook/ Twitter/Flickr/Ning, etc. when they should be talking to people face to face? This type of question is asked a lot by people who don’t yet “get” social media. Socializing with others is only one of the reasons to use social media. People are turning away from newspapers and television and turning to social media to obtain Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland 2
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 6
news, learn new things, and entertain each other with pictures, videos, music, and games. The reason this shift has begun is simple: social media can gratify certain needs better than older forms of media. The uses and gratifications theory of communications uses the media consumer rather than the media message as its starting point, and explores a person’s communication behavior in terms of their direct experience with the media. Individuals are not acted upon by media and its message, they make a conscious choice of what medium to use and what messages to receive depending on how certain needs are met. These needs can be broken into four different categories: 1. The need for entertainment and escapism 2. The need to develop personal relationships 3. The need to affirm or further develop a personal identity through knowledge and interests 4. The need of surveillance, or the understanding of the surrounding world We all use media to gratify these four needs. The type of media we choose to use depends on whether or not we feel our need is gratified by that media. The more gratification we receive from a particular medium, the more likely we are to return to that medium time and time again. Some people are content using the newspaper to obtain information about their community, escape, and develop an identity. Others develop a personal identity through the television shows they watch, and the personal relationships they feel they have developed with television personalities. Ask anyone who regularly uses social media why they do so, and every reason they give can be attributed to one of the four needs. By using the Internet and mobile devices, social media has the advantage of utilizing four concepts that that are unique to the Internet, making it a medium that better gratifies the needs of the user: Interactivity The more the consumer has the ability to customize and interact with social media to better meet their needs, the more gratifications will be obtained, and the more the user will be dependent on that social media in the future. Obtaining news through television or the newspaper does not give one the ability to immediately interact with those that produce the news. Social media outlets such as Twitter, however, allow the user to immediately respond to a reporter and their audience directly and hopefully receive a response. Demassification No longer are we limited to socializing with those in our immediate surroundings. Through social media, similar interests, not geographic space, defines who we socialize with. Ning is a social media site designed specifically to bring people together based on their similar interests. There is a Ning community for almost every type of interest. Being active in an online community about something you are interested in is much more gratifying than passively watching a television program that you are only somewhat interested in. Additionally, interests define who we are, and social media allows us to further express and develop our personality with others. Asynchroneity The Internet has given the consumer more control over how and when to receive their news & entertainment. Consumers now control when they decide to consume media. This, of course, includes social media. If you are busy, do what you need to do, your social media friends will be there when you have a free moment. It is easy to catch up on the news of the day, respond to tweets, or comment on a friends’ picture when you have the free time. Socializing and consuming media on YOUR watch is far more gratifying than rearranging your entire day to fit a predetermined schedule. Hypertextuality Hypertextuality refers to the ability to create links to other web sites through pictures, words, Social Media Club – Cleveland 3 Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 7
graphs, and keywords. This can create a non- linear way of obtaining information online, like channel surfing on the Internet. Social media allows you to share links easily with anyone you want. Likewise, you are able to quickly see what several friends are interested in by following links they have posted. Once again, you and your friends are now in control over what media you consume and when you consume it. These four concepts are ways that the Internet has made all of our lives a little easier, whether it’s by obtaining news, being entertained, socializing with friends, or expressing our personality. These are needs we all seek to gratify on a daily basis. Social media has proven to gratify all of these needs in a greater way than older forms of media. That is reason enough to believe that social media will continue to grow as it meets the needs of more and more people. References Littlejohn, S.W. (1999). Theories of Human Communication (6th edition). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company. Ruggiero, T.E. (2000). Uses and gratifications theory in the 21st century. Mass Communication & Society, 3, 3-37. JD Drake is a marketing communications professional currently seeking employment in the Northeast Ohio area. In 2008, following the publishing of his thesis “Uses & Gratifications: How marketers can utilize emerging media to better meet the needs of their audience,” JD received a MA in communications management – public relations through John Carroll University. Prior to that JD earned a BS in television/radio production - scriptwriting from Ithaca College. He then spent two years in Los Angeles working on various television shows including Malcolm in the Middle, Boston Public, and the Jim Henson Company. In his spare time he wrote and produced short films, television shows, and a full-length musical. JD currently lives in Cleveland Heights with his wife. He enjoys film, cooking, music, a good joke and Cleveland sports teams. You can find him at johndaviddrake@gmail.com, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter ( @JDDrake), Ning, FriendFeed, Del.icio.us, or his blog potkettleblue.blogspot.com. The term social media has emerged to provide a broad categorization for a collection of unique, Web-based tools for personal expression and communication, including blogs, podcasts, video and photo sharing sites, social networking sites, social bookmarking sites, and the latest social media juggernaut, Twitter. The rapid evolution and extraordinary popularity of these technologies has not gone unnoticed by marketing professionals. However, the challenge for marketers who wish to make effective use of social media lies in recognizing that these technologies do not constitute yet another channel for the same tired message. (Every time I see a press release disguised as a blog post I want to stab myself in the brain with a pencil.) What makes social media so uniquely powerful as a marketing tool has far less to do with the technology than it does with an entirely Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland 4
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 8
different approach to connecting with an audience. That connection is defined by its one- to-one-to-one nature, a cascade of individual, personal connections that stands in contrast to previous perceptions and definitions of audience engagement. Stop Selling—Start Talking The problem—well, my problem—with “traditional” marketing communication is that it’s so obviously fluffy and phoney and devoid of any evidence of genuine humanity. Yet in my experience many marketing people seem to think that the audience won’t notice. The audience notices. The audience has always noticed. Whether explaining or complaining, joking or serious, the human voice is unmistakably genuine. It can’t be faked…Most corporations, on the other hand, only know how to talk in the soothing, humorless monotone of the mission statement, marketing brochure, and your-call-is-important-to-us busy signal. Same old tone, same old lies. No wonder networked markets have no respect for companies unable or unwilling to speak as they do. —The Cluetrain Manifesto, 1999 In 2009, despite the explosion in social media, how many businesses have evolved beyond communication that is official, artificial, and superficial? What those businesses fail to understand is that businesses don’t communicate, people communicate. The use of social media makes old-school faceless, sanitized, “official” communication obsolete. And the issue isn’t just about what’s being said—it’s about who’s doing the talking. Be a Mensch A business is a collection of individual people, a kind of techno-organic network within the larger global network. The use of social media tools allows individuals within one network to engage with individuals in other networks on a more personal, and thereby more effective level. For a business, the power in social media centers on the ability to allow individual audience members to tap into the thought processes of the actual people behind the products or services a company provides. For that reason the conversation that connects a person from within the business to members of the customer community must be a genuine reflection of the legitimate interests and passions of the individuals involved. The pursuit of those interests and passions rarely follows a straight line, and the creative spark that triggers innovation might be wildly off-topic. That’s the nature of human conversation. The challenge for the business is If anyone here is from advertising or marketing—kill yourselves…There’s no rationalization for what you do and you are Satan’s little helpers. —a performance by the late Bill Hicks, circa 1993 Despite its startling violence, that routine from the late comedian and social critic Bill Hicks elicited enthusiastic applause in performances in the early Nineties. At about the same time the World Wide Web launched on a trajectory that would do for long-established business and communication models what a very large comet is believed to have done for the dinosaurs. A few years later the authors of The Cluetrain Manifesto brought into sharp focus the nature of the dysfunctional relationship that emerged between business and the newly networked consumer in the early days of the Web. 5 Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 9
to get out of the way of that conversation in order to allow a genuine human connection to form, a connection based on mutual value to the individuals. Look at these two equations and let me know which one has the most benefit to you: 1. Message 1,000,000 to possibly reach 100 2. Personally reach 100 who influence 1,000 who influence 10,000 who influence 1,000,000 —Redefining reach; the new marketing equation by Matt Dickman, 2008 That connection is unlikely to form if the people representing the business in the conversation behave like an under-quota insurance salesman at a cocktail party. You wouldn’t want to get stuck talking to that guy, so don’t be that guy. Talk shop, talk about projects you’re involved in. Share your insight and expertise, but don’t abuse your connections, and never, never, never resort to fluff. Each of us is an individual node in an ever- expanding global network. Social media tools allow us to create and manage our own connections. The level and extent of that personal interconnection is unique in human history. That’s a tectonic shift in the business environment, but businesses can survive the resulting tremor if they learn to unleash—and trust—the individual voices within and learn to participate in, rather than attempt to control, the conversation that is the catalyst for that connection. A writer, editor, and social media practitioner/evangelist, Bob Rhubart manages the Software Architect Community on the Oracle Technology Network, the online community for Oracle Corporation. In that role Bob uses a wide array of social media tools, including a blog, Twitter, Facebook, Friendfeed, del.ici.ous, and others. Before joining Oracle in June 2008, Bob was a senior product marketing specialist for BEA Systems, where he was instrumental in driving the use of blogs as part of the BEA AquaLogic marketing strategy. Before that he was director of content and community for Flashline, Inc., a Cleveland-based enterprise software start-up, where he spearheaded the launch of the Flashline blog in 1993, made extensive use of RSS as part of a homegrown automated content management strategy, and also developed a collaborative, wiki -based product documentation process. Prior to joining Flashline in 1999 Bob was a staff editor at Books.com, the very first online bookstore, founded in Cleveland in 1992. He blogs on social media and Web 2.0 at Smallification.com. Excerpts from “The Stories that Connect Us” (DesigningLife Books 2009) Micro-media platforms are now dominating the way we connect with people in our social networks. These are the media of text messaging, status updating, and micro-blogging that reduce the richness and complexity of life to sound bites. Central to the conversation about the future of narrative is the question about the impact of Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland 6
Welcome to Social Media - What is Social Media? - page 10
micro-media on our capacity for telling and listening to our stories. In the realms of linguistics and cultural anthropology, sound bites are the opposites of stories. Storytelling is the practice of informational generosity, giving us meaningful insights into characters, understanding of contexts, and appreciation for how things unfold and come to be. Sound bites are stingy tools, depriving us of the richness of stories and giving us only crumbs from of an otherwise lavish meal. This being so, the logical conclusion on micro- media is that it will be the bane of storytelling and the sustainability of a narrative culture. In practice, micro-media is demonstrating two observable trends. People who tend to be stingy communicators anyway, are using it in the way they naturally express themselves—in sound bites. At the same time, people who flourish in a narrative culture are using the same sound bites as conversational hyperlinks to accessing all kinds of stories they would never have heard without micro-media. People see a message or posting from someone in the morning and later that day, or the next, they run into the sender. This offers an instant opportunity to inquire into the whole narrative and back story, something they'd not have been able to access without micro-media. The haiku brevity of micro-media can do as much to spark a revolution or fan the flames of inspiration as anything of greater bandwidth or volume. Micro-media services are already figural players in the instigation of business resurgences and new collaboration opportunities among people who thrive daily in the micro-media spaces. As the hyperlink has become a profound metaphor in hyper-connected times, micro- media tools can become both serendipitous containers of hyperlinks and rich hyperlinking invitations through which we tell our stories. Here are 5 easy things to do to increase the power of your stories and leverage the possibilities of your connections. 1. Build your narrative portfolio Start creating a collection of your stories, building a portfolio of stories that have the power to amuse others, endear them to you, and engage them in topics you’re most passionate about. 2. Turn experiences into stories The only stories you have are the ones you intentionally create. Start a journal where you take your life experiences and craft them into the structure of stories. 3. Lengthen your stories Use details, companion stories and vignettes to make any of your stories longer. Make sure whatever you add increases the delight of anticipation inherent in the fabric of the story. 4. Change your sharability footprints Recraft some stories in ways that allow you to tell them to more people; decide which stories you want to stop telling and retelling because they don’t add value to your connections with others. 5. Tell every story better When listening to stories, ask any questions that will glean more details and insights so that you can tell the story better than you heard it. Jack Ricchiuto is a writer and mentor engaging people in the kinds of conversations that have the power to create change. His clients are leaders, organizations, and communities seeking new approaches to leadership, strategic planning, project management, and 7 Welcome to Social Media: Volume 1, June 2009 Social Media Club – Cleveland
You're reading the first 10 out of 39 pages of this docs, please download or login to readmore.

People are reading about...