Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger

Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger free pdf ebook was written by Smerritt on November 08, 2011 consist of 40 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.ivcc.edu and available on pdfpedia since March 29, 2012.

the developing person through the life span 8e by kathleen stassen berger chapter..do something to gain praise or some other reinforcement. culture and emotional..their parents nurture them play • play is the most productive and enjoyable activity...

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Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger pdf




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Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 1
The Developing Person Through the Life Span 8e by Kathleen Stassen Berger Chapter 10 – Early Childhood: Psychosocial Development PowerPoint Slides developed by Martin Wolfger and Michael James Ivy Tech Community College-Bloomington Reviewed by Raquel Henry Lone Star College, Kingwood
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Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 2
Emotional Development Emotional Regulation – The ability to control when and how emotions are expressed due to connections between limbic system and prefrontal cortex Initiative versus guilt – Erikson’s third psychosocial crisis, in which children undertake new skills and activities and feel guilty when they do not succeed at them.
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 3
Emotional Development Self-concept: A person’s understanding of who he or she is, incorporating self-esteem, appearance, personality, and various traits (e.g. gender, size). • Protective Optimism: Preschoolers predict that they can solve impossible puzzles, remember long lists of words, and control their dreams. – Helps them try new things
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 4
Motivation Intrinsic motivation – Occurs when people do something for the joy of doing it. Extrinsic motivation – Occurs when people do something to gain praise or some other reinforcement.
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 5
Culture and Emotional Control Goals for emotional regulation that seem to be important in certain cultures: Overcome fear (United States) Modify anger (Puerto Rico) Temper pride (China) Control aggression (Japan) Be patient and cooperative (Native American communities)
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 6
Seeking Emotional Balance • Lack of emotional regulation may be an early sign of psychopathology (disorder of the mind) Externalizing problems – expressing powerful feelings through uncontrolled physical or verbal outbursts, as by lashing out at other people or breaking things Internalizing problems – turning one’s emotional distress inward, as by feeling excessively guilty, ashamed, or worthless
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 7
The Brains of Boys and Girls • Neurological and hormonal effects: – Boys tend to be aggressive (externalizing) – Girls tend to be anxious (internalizing) • Psychopathology is not typical! – Children of both sexes usually learn to regulate their emotions as their brains mature and their parents nurture them
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 8
Play • Play is the most productive and enjoyable activity that children undertake • Play is universal and timeless
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 9
Play Form of play changes with age and culture • Increasingly complex social play is due to brain maturation coupled with many hours of social play • Children must learn how to make, and keep, friends • Young children play best with peers • Toddlers are not yet good playmates
Invitation to the Life Span by Kathleen Stassen Berger - page 10
Playmates Peers: • People of about the same age and social status • Provide practice in emotional regulation, empathy, and social understanding • Children usually prefer to play with each other rather than with their parents
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