Write from the Beginning… and Beyond

Write from the Beginning… and Beyond free pdf ebook was written by Paul Plisiewicz on September 21, 2011 consist of 28 page(s). The pdf file is provided by www.thinkingmaps.com and available on pdfpedia since March 28, 2012.

write from the beginning… and beyond preview packet spiral-bound training manual wy ie op ev c pr o..grade fourth and fifth grade personal chronological narrative rubric basic structure personal..op ev c pr o t write from the beginning . . ....

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Write from the Beginning… and Beyond pdf




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Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 1
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond Preview Packet Spiral-bound Training Manual
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Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 2
w y ie op ev C Pr ot Write from the Beginning...and Beyond Narrative Writing (Grades K—8) T ABLE OF C ONTENTS Overview Narrative Writing: Overview What is Narrative Writing? Focus on Personal Experience Narratives Goals for Personal Experience Narrative Writing D o N 5 5 8 10–15 Laying the Foundation The Personal Experience Narrative in Kindergarten Kindergarten Personal Experience Narrative Rubric Sample Kindergarten Mini-Lessons The Personal Experience Narrative in First Grade First Grade Observational/Comment Rubric First Grade Recount Narrative Rubric Sample First Grade Mini-Lessons 17 30 35 37 62 69 74 Building the Structure The Personal Experience Narrative in Second Grade Second Grade Chronological Narrative Rubric Second Grade Categorical Narrative Rubric Sample Second Grade Mini-Lessons The Personal Experience Narrative in Third Grade Third Grade Personal Chronological Narrative Rubric Third Grade Personal Categorical Narrative Rubric Sample Third Grade Mini-Lessons 77 89 102 107–112 113 128 141 147–153 T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2010 All Rights Reserved 3
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 3
Developing with Strategies w y ie op ev C Pr ot 155 160 178 247 260 265–272 273 289 290 298 306 The Personal Experience Narrative in Fourth and Fifth Grade Getting the Basic Structure Moving Beyond the Basic Structure in Fourth and Fifth Grade Fourth and Fifth Grade Personal Chronological Narrative Rubric Basic Structure Personal Categorical Narrative Rubric Sample Fourth and Fifth Grade Mini-Lessons Progressing to the Autobiographical Incident • The Chronological Personal Experience Narrative in Sixth through Eighth Grade • Scoring Rubric for Autobiographical Incident Writing • Prompts and Ideas to Stimulate Autobiographical Incident Writing • The Categorical Personal Experience Narrative • Scoring Rubric for Autobiographical Experience Writing Focus on Imaginative/Fictional Narratives Focus on Imaginative or Fictional Narratives Imaginative Writing in Kindergarten Imaginative Writing in First Grade First Grade Imaginative Narrative Rubric Imaginative Writing in Second Grade Second Grade Imaginative Narrative Rubric Imaginative Writing in Third Grade Third Grade Imaginative Narrative Rubric Imaginative Writing in Fourth through Eighth Grade Fourth through Eighth Grade Imaginative Narrative Rubric Imaginative Narrative Activity Imaginative Narrative Team Stories Fictional Narratives D o N 307 309 311 315 319 327 333 344 349 355 360 361 363 Resources • Suggested Books for Teaching Writing (K–8) 365
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 4
Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond Narrative Writing — Overview w y ie op ev C Pr ot Narrative Writing Overview § What is Narrative Writing? Narrative writing is often referred to as story writing. A story can be told or written, long or short, true or made up. Stories have been passed on for generations as a form of entertainment, but also as a way to teach us life’s lessons. They have existed as long as mankind. Children of all ages love to hear stories; they are naturally attracted to them whether they are told orally, through books, through television, or some other form of media. Stories can be realistic; they tell us about someone or something that seems real. They can also be fantasy; they have characters and places that are not like real life. Even realistic stories can be made up when a writer uses people and things from real life. Whether realistic or fantasy, a piece of narrative writing is a work of art, carefully crafted by the author to provide entertainment for the reader. Oral narratives appear to come naturally and are much easier to produce than written narratives. When telling stories aloud, narrators may tell events out of order or they may leave out some important details. The gestures, expressions, and tone of the storyteller’s voice can relay quite a bit of information; and those that are listening can ask questions if necessary. Written narratives, on the other hand, require much more thought. The information must be presented in an organized manner with a central idea, a plotline, vivid description, and some type of culminating event. Written narratives require a strong structure and essential elements that are unique to this type of writing. For this reason, students need explicit instruction in how to create a narrative composition. D o N T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved 5
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 5
Narrative Writing — Overview Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond w y ie op ev C Pr ot T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved All narratives are not the same. There are at least two types of narrative writing that students will need to encounter. The first is the personal experience narrative. This kind of narrative focuses on the experience of the writer rather than the characters in the story. The personal experience narrative might be organized chronologically as the incident is told as a series of events that move through time. Sunshine Home by Eve Bunting is an example of a narrative that moves chronologically. The personal experience narrative might also be organized categorically. When organized in this manner, the narrative tells about an experience but not as a chronology of events; instead, there are numerous personal experiences that support one overall theme or big idea. Cynthia Rylant’s book, When I Was Young in the Mountains, is organized in this way. In this simple picture book, Rylant relates varied experiences that she has had in the mountains with her grandparents. The overall “feel” or big idea of the book is that she enjoyed her time in the mountains. Her writing appears more reflective and circular than event driven. The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros contains numerous personal experience narratives that are organized categorically. Whether organized chronologically or categorically, the personal experience narrative relates something that is important to the writer and something that the writer wants to share with others. The feelings and emotions of the writer and vivid language are essential components of the personal experience narrative. The second type of narrative is the imaginative narrative, a story that involves strong characters, a distinct setting, a problem or situation, and some type of solution or resolution. This type of writing, in its simplest form, is structured in a problem/solution format. Using this structure, the main character encounters problems that he or she tries to solve through numerous attempts throughout the story. In the end, the problem is solved and the character is a type of “hero.” In some instances, there is resolution rather than solution to the problem as the main character becomes resigned to the situation. Heat Wave by Helen Ketterman and A Bad Case of Stripes by David Shannon are both examples of the problem/solution format. A more sophisticated variety of imaginative narrative involves an “intriguing or challenging adventure.” Instead of encountering and attempting to solve one particular problem, the main character deals with a “situation,” which can either be problematic or increasingly unrealistic or imaginative. Throughout the story, the main character/ characters must either overcome a series of obstacles or experience increasing intensity of the situation. The movie Pirates of the Caribbean is an example of an intriguing adventure with obstacles or challenges that must be overcome. Most adventurous movies and stories/books fit into this category and are popular with students. The book 6 D o N
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 6
Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond Narrative Writing — Overview w y ie op ev C Pr ot Meanwhile Back at the Ranch by Trinka Hakes Noble is an example of an intriguing adventure with increasing intensity as Rancher Hick’s wife gets richer and richer as he experiences boredom in town. Another example of the increasing intensity variety is the book The Principal from the Black Lagoon by Mike Thaler. In this story, a young boy sits and waits to go into the principal’s office to receive punishment for an infraction. As he waits, he imagines increasingly bizarre punishments that he could receive (e.g. “she turns some kids into coat racks”). Whether the imaginative narrative is structured in a problem/solution format or as an intriguing adventure, strong characters and setting, as well as vivid language are essential components of the writing. This type of writing also incorporates humor, suspense and tension, or drama into the story. Note: This manual on Narrative Writing is presented in two parts. The first part focuses on Personal Experience Narratives, and the second part focuses on Imaginative Narratives. D o N T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved 7
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 7
Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond Narrative Writing — Second Grade w y ie op ev C Pr ot The Personal Experience Narrative in Second Grade § What does the Personal Experience Narrative look like in Second Grade? Second graders should be able to compose a personal experience narrative organized in a chronological format. It should have beginning and ending sentences. Between the opening and closing sentences there should be several sentences that depict a logical sequence of events within an obvious time frame. While the chronologically organized personal experience narrative is the format most frequently used by teachers and in assessments, second graders can also learn to compose a personal experience narrative organized in a thematic/memoir format. This composition should have beginning and ending sentences. Between the opening and closing there should be several sentences organized categorically or logically in such a way as to create an overall general impression. In each type of writing students should use some detail and descriptive language. The ability to perform these competencies will be facilitated by extensive teacher modeling as well as numerous opportunities for practice and individual conferences. D o N T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved 77
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 8
Narrative Writing — Second Grade Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond w y ie op ev C Pr ot D Addressing the Prompt Second graders will spend many of their writing sessions developing topics that they have chosen. However, these students will also need practice writing to specific prompts to enable the teacher to evaluate more effectively their development as writers. Through teacher modeling and mini-lessons, students learn to identify key words in the prompts that must appear in their writing. For example, a prompt might read: Tell about a time that you received a gift from someone in your family or from a friend. Students should be directed to underline key words like received, gift, family or friend. As students begin to compose, they should constantly refer to the prompt to make sure they are staying focused on these key words. The Opening Sentence The opening sentence is the forerunner of the introductory paragraph students will compose as their writing skills become more developed. Second graders should be able to write an opening sentence that tells what the writing will be about. For example, they will state Who? Did what? When? if composing a narrative (e.g. “Last Christmas my friend Susan gave me a special gift.”).The opening sentence should always address the prompt; however, it should never restate the prompt. The Middle Sentences The middle sentences in the personal experience narrative that is organized sequentially tell the events in the order in which they happened. Teacher modeling should be used to introduce and develop the use of transition words and phrases as chronological markers. Teachers should use extreme caution not to use fixed, slotted-in transition words such as first, next, then, and last. It will be helpful to keep charts in the classroom with lists of multiple transition words to which students might refer. The middle sentences in the personal experience narrative that is organized categorically tells about the experience through like ideas or categories of information. For example, if a student writes about visiting his grandparents, he could tell about baking cookies with his grandmother, chopping wood with his grandfather, and playing with his grandparents’ pet dog. The student narrates an experience; however, it is not told in the exact order in which the events occurred. o N 78 T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 9
Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond Narrative Writing — Second Grade w y ie op ev C Pr ot The middle sentences represent an opportunity for second graders to engage in the use of details and descriptive language. Through teacher modeling and mini-lessons, students can be directed to “tell me more” regarding their sentences. For example, if a student writes “First we saw a bear,” the teacher asks questions such as What color was the bear? Where was the bear? What was the bear doing? The goal is for the student to learn to write sentences such as: “First we saw a brown bear. He was sitting in the corner of his cage eating berries for his lunch.” D The Closing Sentence The closing sentence is the precursor of the closing paragraph that students will compose as their writing skills become more developed. Second-grade students should be able to write a closing sentence that brings some type of closure to the written piece. In other words, they should be able to state what they learned, an opinion, or a feeling about the experience about which they have written. It is beneficial for the students to use key words from the prompt in their closing sentences; however, they should not restate the prompt in their closings. Teachers should use extreme caution not to model or accept fixed, slotted-in closure such as “I felt happy.” o N T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved 79
Write from the Beginning… and Beyond - page 10
Narrative Writing — Second Grade Write from the Beginning . . . and Beyond w y ie op ev C Pr ot T HINKING M APS , I NC . © 2011 All Rights Reserved Student Sample of Personal Experience Narratives (organized sequentially) D o N 86
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